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Monett Seeks Public Input on Ideas to Make Downtown Healthier

Monett is looking to its residents for ideas on how to make its downtown area a healthier place. A two-day session this week is focusing on what priorities are most important for the community. The event, today and tomorrow (10/17-10/18) is part of a Healthy Places for Healthy People grant from the US Environmental Protection Agency. It focuses on improving access to healthcare, promoting healthier lifestyles, increasing physical activity and attracting more investment to the city’s...

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Drug Companies Make Eyedrops Too Big, And You Pay For The Waste

If you've ever put in eyedrops, some of them have almost certainly spilled onto your eyelid or cheek. The good news is the mess doesn't necessarily mean you missed. The bad news is that medicine you wiped off your face is wasted by design — and it's well-known to the drug companies that make the drops. Eyedrops overflow our eyes because drug companies make the typical drop — from glaucoma drugs that cost hundreds of dollars to cheap over-the-counter bottles — larger than a human eye can hold....

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The Pentagon is tightening the screening process for immigrants who volunteer for military service and slowing their path to U.S. citizenship.

The U.S. military will no longer allow green card holders to enter basic training before the successful completion of a background check. The policy change is intended to improve security vetting of foreign-born recruits.

Rasika, an Indian restaurant in Washington, D.C., has won just about every recognition possible. The Washington Post called it the No. 1 restaurant in the city. The chef has won a James Beard award — basically the Oscars of the food world. President Obama celebrated his birthday there — twice. And though the place has been open for more than a decade, it is only just now coming out with a cookbook.

Mandalay Bay security guard Jesus Campos spoke for the first time publicly about his experience the night a gunman killed 58 people at a country music festival in Las Vegas. Campos, who was the first person to confront the killer, had remained largely out of the public eye.

The Trump administration says it wants lawmakers to pass the Republican tax overhaul plan by the end of the year. It aims to spur revenue by cutting taxes for U.S. businesses and earners, including the country’s wealthiest. Arthur Laffer is considered by many to be “the father of supply-side economics,” the theory that forms the backbone of the current overhaul plan.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Laffer, who was also a Trump campaign adviser and an adviser to President Ronald Reagan.

The revelation that Republican Rep. Tom Marino of Pennsylvania — the White House nominee to head the National Office of Drug Control Policy — sponsored legislation that favored the drug industry while receiving campaign contributions from that same industry led to Marino withdrawing his name from consideration. Meanwhile, President Trump has announced that he will declare the opioid epidemic a national emergency.

A year after a computer beat a human world champion in the ancient strategy game of Go, researchers say they have constructed an even stronger version of the program — one that can teach itself without the benefit of human knowledge.

The program, known as AlphaGo Zero, became a Go master in just three days by playing 4.9 million games against itself in quick succession.

Throughout his presidential campaign and since, President Trump has made bold assertions about his charitable giving. But as the Washington Post has thoroughly documented, those boasts of philanthropy don't always stand up to scrutiny.

For people with diabetes, keeping blood sugar levels in a normal range – not too high or too low – is a lifelong challenge. New technologies to ease the burden are emerging rapidly, but insurance reimbursement challenges, supply shortages, and shifting competition make it tough for patients to access them quickly.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Chinese President Xi Jinping proclaimed the arrival of "a new era" in which a reinvigorated Communist Party will lead his nation to modernity, wealth and power as he opened the 19th national congress of China's ruling Communist Party on Wednesday.

The meeting is expected to give him a second five-year term.

Xi's speech, delivered in the cavernous Great Hall of the People overlooking Beijing's Tiananmen Square, lasted for 3 1/2 hours and traced the broad outlines of his vision and the party's policies.

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