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Pea Ridge National Military Park

Pea ridge National Military Park
Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise

I’m Jeremy Shreckhise, KSMU’s photographer and graphic designer. Since I was a child, I’ve had a love for history. Some of my fondest memories are of family trips to museums and historical sites. The rich history of the American Civil War is particularly interesting to me. Over 5000 battles were fought in 23 states between 1861 and 1865. The National Parks Conservation Association lists 76 battlefields, historic sites and monuments pertaining to this great conflict. Two of those locations are right here in the Ozarks, Wilson's Creek National Battlefield and Pea Ridge National Military Park.

On March 7 and 8, 1862, The Battle of Pea Ridge was fought northeast of Rogers, Arkansas. Here 16,000 Confederate soldiers that were headed to capture St. Louis were stopped by 10,500 Union troops, keeping control of Missouri in Union hands. Over 4,000 perished in the conflict. Pea Ridge National Military Park features 4,300 acres and a seven-mile tour road. I have driven and biked through these beautifully preserved grounds. On a recent visit, I took time to chronicle some of the important moments of this important historic site.

We at KSMU would like to invite you to share your photos and memories of the Historical Sites you have been to.  Thanks for visiting us online; we hope to hear from you!

A reproduction of the Union uniform worn by many at the battle of Pea Ridge. Located in the Visitor Center. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) A reproduction of the Confederate uniform worn by many at the battle of Pea Ridge. Located in the Visitor Center. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) A reproduction of an 8 lb. cannon ball used at the Battle of Pea Ridge. Located in the Visitor Center. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) The site of Union commander Samuel Curtis' headquarters. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) The battery located at Union headquarters. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) A cannon overlooking the Leetown Battlefield. Here Union forces held off a Confederate attack. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) The union insignia engraved in the top of one of the cannons at the Leetown Battlefield. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) The battery located at Leetowm battlefield. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) A fence on the northern edge of Leetown Battlefield. Confederate generals Ben McCulloch and James McIntosh were killed near here. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) The overlook on top of Pea Ridge. This was the only major battle of the war where Indian troops participated. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) A plaque atop pea Ridge.  (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) Life on Pea Ridge.  (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) Flowers bloom where blood was once spilled.  (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) The Elkhorn Tavern was the contested point in the supply route for the Union and Confederacy alike. It also served as a field hospital for both sides. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) The Union battery southwest of the Elkhorn Tavern drove the Confederates from the tavern area. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) The monument honoring the Confederate's who died at Pea Ridge. It was erected in 1887 by the citizens of Benton County, Arkansas. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) The monument honoring the Confederate's who died at Pea Ridge. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) The monument honoring the Confederate's who died at Pea Ridge memorializes Gen. James McIntosh. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) The monument honoring the Confederate's who died at Pea Ridge memorializes Gen. Ben McCullough. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) The monument honoring the Confederate's who died at Pea Ridge memorializes Gen. W.Y. Slack. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) The Reunited Soldiery Monument that was erected in 1889 by Confederate and Union veterans. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise) The Reunited Soldiery Monument that was erected in 1889 by Confederate and Union veterans. (Photo credit: Jeremy Shreckhise)