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Volunteers at CoxHealth and CBCO Feel Like They're Doing Their Civic Duty

Bob Dickens is 76--he retired more than once.  He flew in the service for 22 years, then flew commercially for the U.S. Forest Service and for movie studios in L.A.  He also worked as an investigator for the National Transportation and Safety Board, then worked for the Federal Aviation Administration.

These days he's a volunteer at Cox South and at his grandson's school.  And he says he's never felt more fulfilled.

When Dickens retired for the final time and had time on his hands it didn't take long for him to figure out where he wanted to help out...

He works at the information desks at Cox two days a week and at his grandson's school once a week.  He helps out, he says, because he feels it's his civic duty to do so...

Dickens says he feels a desire to give back and to make a difference.  That's why he's unselfish with the time he worked so hard to earn...

Like many not-for-profits, CoxHealth relies on many volunteers who feel a pull to do their civic duty.  So does the Community Blood Center of the Ozarks.  Chris Pilgrim is the CBCO's marketing director.  He explains what civic duty means to him...

He says they wouldn't be able to operate without the many people who give their time to help out...

And, of course, the blood center's blood donors are a vital part of the organization, helping patients in 38 hospitals in Southwest Missouri, Northwest Arkansas and Southeast Kansas.

Ty Pierce is one of them.  The instructor of psychology, sociology and human sexuality at Drury University, has been giving blood for about ten years--he's up to ten gallons and two pints.

He was afraid of needles until he went through allergy testing and overcame that fear.  He decided that, since he was no longer afraid of needles, he'd try giving blood.  The first time, he almost passed out...

Pierce started giving blood so he could help people.  He says it's a chance to do his civic duty...

Pierce says, to him, civic duty boils down to the basic Christian belief--treat people how you'd want to be treated, no matter who they are.

He says when he gives blood, it's almost like a little high...

Both Pierce and Bob Dickens plan to keep giving back until they can no longer do so.  Pierce takes his two young daughters with him when he gives blood.  He hopes that, by doing so, he's being a good role model.

For KSMU and the Sense of Community Series, I'm Michele Skalicky.