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Armed men wearing military fatigues gathered on armored personnel carriers Wednesday in the eastern Ukrainian city of Slovyansk, where they and other pro-Russia gunmen took control of some key locations.

Secretary of State John Kerry is among those gathering in Geneva to see if they can find a diplomatic solution. The prospects for progress appear to be slim.

The 304,000 applications filed last week means they were close to the lowest level since May 2007. Analysts say the news is another sign that the economy continues to grow.

Russian President Vladimir Putin as he answered questions on national TV Thursday in Moscow.

It was one spy speaking to another, as Putin put it, when "NSA leaker" Edward Snowden asked the Russian leader on national TV whether his nation has a program like the U.S. National Security Agency's.

An employee prepares an order at Amazon's fulfillment center in San Bernardino, Calif.

Also: Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez's health is said to be stable but "very fragile"; Dave Eggers' new book is called Your Fathers, Where Are They? And the Prophets, Do They Live Forever?.

A typical UPS truck now has hundreds of sensors on it. That's changing the way UPS drivers work — and it foreshadows changes coming for workers throughout the economy.

Medicaid - ER

Supporters of Medicaid expansion in Missouri continue to work toward swaying opponents in the General Assembly over to their side. Marshall Griffin takes a closer look.

Mimi Pond's graphic memoir is a rose (or in this case aqua) tinted recollection of her time waitressing at a bohemian diner in Oakland in the 1970s. Reviewer Etelka Lehoczky says it's a sweet tribute.

Holding out hope, fearing the worst: A man looks out from the shore in Jindo, South Korea, toward where a passenger ferry sank Wednesday and nearly 300 people are still missing.

Divers are having difficulty getting into the capsized ship. It was sailing to a resort island Wednesday when disaster struck. Most of the passengers were high school students on a school trip.

Analysis of innovation at private companies in the U.S. and across the world finds an inverse relationship correlation between disruptive innovation and the age of managers at those companies.

Secretary of State John Kerry is in Geneva to meet with his diplomatic counterparts from Russia, Ukraine and the European Union. They are trying to find a resolution to the crisis in Ukraine.

Mo. Gov. Jay Nixon, D, answers questions from reporters on his opposition to this year's tax cut bill, SB509.

A controversial tax cut proposal has been sent to Governor Jay Nixon, after the Missouri House passed it late Wednesday afternoon.   Marshall Griffin reports.

NPR

In 1954, the Supreme Court outlawed segregation. David Greene talks to ProPublica's Nikole Hannah-Jones about her story in The Atlantic. She examines the failure of school desegregation.

NPR

Many banks are reporting their first quarter earnings this week, and the results have been mixed. Bank of America turned in a loss after taking a big charge for legal expenses. Citigroup says it will lay off as many as 300 stock and bond traders in an effort to cut costs.

Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.

Last week marked another low-point in the Syrian civil war. A unidentified gunman assassinated a Dutch priest in the city of Homs. Father Frans van der Lugt had lived in Syria for nearly five decades.

Rhonda Sanderson and her ex-husband, John Amato III, shown here in 2010, helped make a business thrive after they divorced.

Most often, when married business owners divorce, both relationships sour. But that's not always the case. Some couples have figured out a way to make their companies succeed even after they've split.

Backers of the new Open Source Seed Initiative will pass out 29 new varieties of fourteen different crops, including broccoli, carrots and kale on Thursday.

Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.

Virginia Solera Garcia helps runs the CYD Santa Maria shelter with her sister, Concordia Márquez, adopting horses that might otherwise end up in the food supply.

Once status symbols for newly minted millionaires, horses are now the voiceless victims in Spain's economic crash. Two sisters are adopting horses that might otherwise end up in the food supply.

A child receives a polio vaccine Sunday in Kano, Nigeria. The country serves as the primary reservoir of the virus in Africa. But the current outbreak in Equatorial Guinea came by way of Chad, rather than Nigeria.

It's the first polio cases in Equatorial Guinea since 1999. The virus spread from neighboring Cameroon. When polio is on the move in Central Africa, the toll can be tragic.

John Edwards leaves a federal courthouse during his trial on charges of campaign corruption in 2012.

NPR

The former U.S. senator and Democratic presidential hopeful is one of three attorneys representing a boy in a medical malpractice case in North Carolina.

What you're prescribed may depend on what samples your doctor gets from drug companies.

A study with dermatologists adds to growing evidence that free drug samples influence doctors' prescribing habits. The cost difference to patients can be hundreds of dollars per office visit.

Jewish Community Center

Sunday's shooting in Kansas City has reignited the conversation about anti-Semitism, hate crimes and how to prevent future incidents.  Recent statistics released in an annual report from the Anti-Defamation League suggests that anti-Semitic incidents were down significantly nationwide.  But is this a true reflection of societal changes?  KSMU's Theresa Bettmann has this report.

According to the Nigerian military, all but eight of the girls kidnapped from a Nigerian boarding school have been rescued. As many as 100 girls had been abducted by militants earlier in the week.

Unlike many young women in her ultra-Orthodox Jewish community, Yael Mizrachi drives and has two university degrees. She's also having a difficult time finding a spouse.

Young ultra-Orthodox Jews are increasingly pursuing college degrees or joining the workforce. That's challenged matchmaking customs, and led to a new service that connects like-minded men and women.