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Secretary of State John Kerry is set to meet Thursday with officials from Russia, Ukraine and the European Union. They will discuss the crisis in Ukraine. While the Obama administration has said it has overwhelming evidence that Moscow is stirring up the unrest in eastern Ukraine, it says it wants to wait before expanding sanctions. Analysts say Washington has few other options.

Former Bell city manager Robert Rizzo arrives at the Edward R. Roybal Federal building and United States courthouse on Monday. Rizzo received 12 years in prison and was ordered to pay nearly $9 million in restitution for a scheme to pad his salary.

Robert Rizzo, who pay himself an $800,000 salary for running the small town of Bell, Calif., took advantage of the fact that there were "no checks and balances" in city government, the judge said.

McFadden has learned to capture various hues of brown skin.

When Syreeta McFadden was young, she dreaded being photographed. Cameras made her skin look darkened and distorted. Now a photographer herself, she's learned to capture various hues of brown skin.

Crime writer Giorgio Scerbanenco was born in Kiev in 1911, grew up in Rome and worked for decades as a journalist in Milan.

A crackling new translation of Giorgio Scerbanenco's crime novel Private Venus has just been released. Critic John Powers read it in a single sitting.

What motivated Edward Snowden to leak NSA secrets? Bryan Burrough,  Suzanna Andrews and Sarah Ellison explore Snowden's background in an article for Vanity Fair.

NPR

What motivated the former NSA contractor to divulge carefully guarded NSA secrets? A new Vanity Fair article takes a look back at the "kid from the Maryland suburbs."

Jessica Grose, who writes for Slate, Bloomberg Businessweek and Fast Company, says that millennials have been mischaracterized in the media.

NPR

Narcissistic and ill-prepared for the future? Or civic-minded and entrepreneurial? Two teams tackle stereotypes and realities about young Americans in the latest Intelligence Squared U.S.

Hurricane Katrina holdout Hazzert Gillett reads his bible in his home in New Orleans, Louisiana, in Sept. 2005. The state's legislation is considering a bill to make the Holy Bible the official state book.

Lawmakers have proposed a bill that would make the Bible the state's official book, but critics say it is unconstitutional and would open Louisiana up to legal challenges.

U.S. District Judge Daniel Hovland called the state's ban on abortions as early as six weeks into pregnancy "invalid and unconstitutional."

Ribbons and security signs are lining the Boston Marathon route, including on this street light.

Prosecutors said it would disturb the families of those who died to know that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev could view those images. The judge ruled Tsarnaev has the right to see such evidence.

Mercy Rehabilitation Hospital Ribbon Cutting

Patients who need rehabilitation in the Ozarks will now have a new place to go for treatment.  Mercy held a blessing and ribbon cutting Wednesday for its new rehabilitation hospital in Springfield.  KSMU’s Michele Skalicky has more.

Tayler Drayton, 16, pictured earlier this month as she  painted words of support on a bus stop for those affected by the deadly mudslide at the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River.

The number of missing is still unclear, but at last count, authorities said 7 people remained unaccounted for from the March 22 mudslide near the community of Oso.

A check of Medicare's new database of payments to physicians confirms that at least $6 million in 2012 went to doctors who had been indicted or otherwise sanctioned.

Among doctors who received payments from Medicare in 2012 are dozens who had been kicked out of Medicaid, or charged with fraud, or settled fraud cases out of court, a ProPublica investigation finds.

A cherry blossom tree on the Potomac. Not bad, eh?

We do grouse about the weather, it's true. But it's miraculous, if you think about it, that we still manage to get excited about spring at all, given that it happens every year.

You've swum with dolphins, ridden camels, stalked tigers. Now, try taking a memory test with a chimp — and losing. It's fun, humbling and mind-boggling.

The Islamist group Boko Haram is suspected. It is also being blamed for Monday's bomb attack that killed more than 70 people in Nigeria's capital.

Washington Post writer Eli Saslow won a Pulitzer Prize for his series on the prevalence of food stamps in post-recession America.

The announcement of the winners and finalists for the Pulitzer Prizes gives us an opportunity to herald great journalism that illuminates matters relating to race, ethnicity and culture.

Cheryl Miller's driver's license was among the evidence collected from the car she and Pamela Jackson were last seen in. The two South Dakota girls disappeared in 1971. Now, authorities say it appears they accidentally drove into a creek. It wasn't until last year that low waters revealed the vehicle.

The two teens disappeared in 1971. Last year, their bodies were found in the Studebaker they were last seen in. Now, authorities say it appears they mistakenly drove into a creek.

Does this blue chicken make you queasy? Scientists say there might be an evolutionary reason for that.

The color of food can affect how we perceive its taste, and food companies aren't afraid to use that to their advantage. An artist tests perceptions by dousing familiar foods with unorthodox colors.

RuPaul rules over RuPaul's Drag Race, a show with a lot of similarities to another Monday night show: WWE Raw.

Libby Hill looks at the worlds of televised drag competition and professional wrestling, and finds that the flash, art and gender performance of the forms make them more alike than they might seem.

Men sit on an armored personnel carrier in Slovyansk, Ukraine, on Wednesday. A Russian flag flies from it. When some Ukrainian forces approached the city, locals say, they were convinced to hand over their vehicles to pro-Russia protesters.

As the government tries to assert control in the eastern part of the nation, there's word that some Ukrainian troops may now be on the side of locals who wish to join Russia.

Ian McEwan talks about having dinner with Salman Rushdie, who had a fatwa out against him; Man Booker winner Eleanor Catton writes about the process of finding inspiration.

Coming in December: The eTrack and the eTag, from Air France and KLM. The innovations let you drop off your bags without checking them, and track them throughout your journey.

Air France and KLM have developed two gadgets — the eTrack and the eTag — that let you drop off your bag without checking it with an agent and track it during your trip.

Rescuers head toward the ferry Sewol off the southern coast of South Korea on Wednesday. It sank while on a trip to a resort island. Several hundred people, most of them high school students and teachers, are missing.

Most of the passengers, according to news reports, were high school students and teachers on a school trip. Of the nearly 500 people who were on board, nearly 300 were initially unaccounted for.

NPR

After years of circulation declines and painful staffing cuts, this year's two Pulitzer Prizes are especially sweet. David Greene talks to Marty Baron, the paper's executive editor.