Asma Khalid

Asma Khalid is a campaign reporter focusing on the intersection of demographics and politics in the 2016 election. Her stories range from exploring how Puerto Rico's fiscal crisis could influence the Florida vote to interviewing the "new millennials" — the Obama-era kids who will be casting their first vote for president in 2016.

Before joining NPR's Election Team, Asma covered politics for Boston's NPR station WBUR.

She's also reported on a number of breaking news stories, including the Boston Marathon bombings and the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger.

Asma got her start in radio through an internship at BBC Newshour in London during grad school. But, she also owes her journalism education to NPR. For a few years after college, she was a producer for NPR's Morning Edition.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Hillary Clinton's bringing out big-name celebrities to energize her Democratic base ahead of the election, like Beyonce who performed for Mrs. Clinton at a concert last night in Cleveland. NPR's Asma Khalid reports.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Muslims are a tiny fraction of the U.S. population, making up somewhere around one percent, according to the Pew Research Center.

But a lot of Muslims live in key battleground states like Florida, Virginia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, which makes them a small but important group.

That's why Hillary Clinton's campaign is trying to make sure they show up in large numbers on Election Day.

Hillary Clinton's "basket of deplorables" remark has echoed through the political interwebs and produced many rounds of cable TV analysis.

Sure, conservatives pounced. And some liberals laughed in agreement. But does it matter in the real world?

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