Emily Yeap

Host, Missouri State Journal

A native of Malaysia, Emily moved to Springfield in 2010 and started working at Missouri State University in 2014. She’s currently the public relations specialist in the office of university communications. She has a BA in Mass Communications from Colorado State University-Pueblo and a Master of Journalism from Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada.

Teaching students how to write is a challenging task. That’s why the Center for Writing in College, Career and Community (CWCCC) at Missouri State University developed the Writing and Thinking Conference to empower teachers to improve student writing.

Held twice a year, the spring 2017 conference is scheduled for March 3. CWCCC director Dr. Keri Franklin sheds more light on the conference and what participants can expect.

Communication Week is a signature event for Missouri State University’s Department of Communication. It focuses on highlighting communication teaching and research, as well as bringing together students, alumni and community members to network.  

This year, the week-long event themed “Make Your Missouri Statement” will take place on campus from Feb. 21-24. 

Historian and scholar Dr. Carter G. Woodson is credited for setting the foundation for what we now know as national Black History Month, observed each February.

In 1926, he launched Negro History Week to bring national attention to the contributions of black Americans throughout history. Then in 1976, during the American bicentennial celebration, President Gerald Ford formally established Black History Month. 

Everyone can do their part to make their communities safer – that’s the core of Green Dot, a bystander intervention program founded by Dr. Dorothy Edwards in 2007.

Green Dot relies on the power of cultural and peer influence to reduce or stop power-based personal violence, such as sexual assault, dating violence and stalking.

Hundreds of schools and universities across the country have adopted the Green Dot strategy. Missouri State University launched the program on campus in August 2016. 

Most everyone agrees parenting is a tough job. That’s why several agencies in Greene County led by the Community Partnership of the Ozarks (CPO) have joined forces to implement the Positive Parenting Program, also known as Triple P.

The program is made possible thanks to a $700,000 grant secured by CPO from the Missouri Foundation for Health.

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