Jennifer Moore

KSMU Contributor/Missouri State University Journalist-in-Residence

As the Journalist-in-Residence at Missouri State University, Jennifer teaches undergraduate and graduate students, oversees a semester-long, team reporting project, and contributes weekly stories to KSMU Radio in the area of public affairs journalism.

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Shannon Bowers

A documentary film crew from Springfield has just returned from Jordan, where they spent a week interviewing Syrian refugees. 

Shannon Bowers is a lead producer and the main interviewer for Carbon Trace Productions film crew.  She and three others landed in Amman, grabbed some hummus and tabbouli, then went to work filming in refugee clinics run by the Syrian American Medical Society.

KSMU Archives

As it stands, Missouri law permits lawmakers to accept gifts like trips, meals and tickets to ball games from lobbyists. And there’s no limit on how much a lobbyist can spend on an elected official.  Governor Eric Greitens has said he’d like to ban lobbyist gifts, but with only a month left in this year’s legislative session, that’s unlikely to happen this year. While that debate continues, we thought it would be helpful to offer a refresher on Missouri law regarding what defines a lobbyist.  

Executive lobbyists

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

The class action lawsuit filed by the ACLU and others against the state of Missouri over its public defender system has been moved from state to federal court, according to Missouri’s public court records database. 

Jacquie Shipma, General Counsel for the Missouri State Public Defender, told KSMU that either court would have been appropriate, since the lawsuit alleges violations of both state and federal law.

But all of the defendants have agreed to have the case moved to federal court, which is a requirement for the change.

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

In the Missouri capitol building in Jefferson City, Representative Holly Rehder, R-Sikeston, has been trying for half a decade to get Missouri to establish a PDMP, or Prescription Drug Monitoring Program.

That’s an electronic records database that would allow prescribers—doctors, dentists, nurse practitioners, and anyone who can prescribe narcotics—to pull up on a screen in the exam room that shows what medicines that patient has been prescribed, and when.

Missouri is the only state where medical professionals don’t have the option of using such a database.

Dierk Schaefer / Flickr

One in every twelve kids in Greene County between 6th and 12th grades is misusing prescription drugs—that’s according to the Missouri Department of Mental Health’s Behavioral Health Profile. And take a guess at the average age for taking that first sip of alcohol: here in Greene County, it’s 13 years old.

All this week, we’re looking at what substance abuse means for our region. 

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