Jennifer Moore

KSMU Contributor/Missouri State University Journalist-in-Residence

As the Journalist-in-Residence at Missouri State University, Jennifer teaches undergraduate and graduate students, oversees a semester-long, team reporting project, and contributes weekly stories to KSMU Radio in the area of public affairs journalism.

Ways to Connect

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

Elementary school kids form a line behind their teacher as they prepare to tour the House chamber in the Missouri Capitol building.

Statistically, about one in every nine of these kids will have a major depressive episode between the ages of 12 and 17, according to the Missouri Department of Mental Health.

State lawmakers, who draft laws that regulate and fund many mental health programs, just wrapped up their 2017 session.

More than half of Missouri’s counties don’t have a licensed psychiatrist, and nearly half don’t have a licensed psychologist.  

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

Until a few years ago, Addie Blankenship saw herself as a relatively healthy mom of three. She didn’t recognize that she was exhibiting symptoms of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder—a mental condition that leads to obsessive thoughts and compulsive actions.

“So I would spend hours and hours washing things. Or I would have a thought that something may be on my clothes, so I would change my clothes every time I’d have a bad thought, which sometimes was 10 times a day. Sometimes more,” Blankenship said.

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

Drive down a dirt road in Dallas County, under a thick canopy of walnut trees and over three cattle guards, and you’ll come to Rachel Harrison’s home in Windyville, Missouri.  

A few years ago, Harrison was using her Bachelor’s degree in biology in a hospital laboratory.

“I was a generalist, which means I was in charge of urinalysis, chemistry, special chemistry, hematology, blood banking, coagulation, I think I got it all—phlebotomy, all that kind of stuff,” Harrison said.

But at age 25, she began to hear what sounded like people talking.

Jennifer Moore

West Plains’ residents displaced by weekend flooding experienced l a third night away from their homes Monday.

On Saturday, the American Red Cross said over 150 people stayed at its shelter inside First Baptist Church. 70 water rescues were performed in Howell County that night. There were no fatalities.

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

Scores of people in West Plains are staying in a shelter operated by the American Red Cross after flash flooding forced 70 water rescues in Howell County Saturday night.  

Cody Bryant, who organizes the Red Cross disaster response in West Plains, said the shelter at the First Baptist Church at 202 Walnut Street provided food, blankets, and medical attention to about 150 flood victims Saturday night. He expects approximately 70 to stay Sunday night, he said.

Pages