Jennifer Moore

KSMU Contributor/Missouri State University Journalist-in-Residence

As the Journalist-in-Residence at Missouri State University, Jennifer teaches undergraduate and graduate students, oversees a semester-long, team reporting project, and contributes weekly stories to KSMU Radio in the area of public affairs journalism.

Ways to Connect

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

In this Sense of Community segment on Innovation in the Ozarks, we’re in a large greenhouse. It belongs to Craig Jennings in Davis Creek, in rural, south-central Missouri.

“Here we have over 120 channels at this end of the greenhouse. And we have enough for eighteen hundred head of lettuce, which we put on a six weeks rotation,” Jennings said.

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

Farmers in the Ozarks know how to grow and produce.

But many farmers struggle with getting the word out to potential buyers that their food is available.

In today’s segment on Innovation in the Ozarks, we’re looking at a startup that offers a new, online model for the marketing and exchange of local food.

Here at the Go Farm outdoor market in West Plains, Zerubbabel Ben Emunah and his wife are selling bread, jelly, and hand-stitched blankets. 

Submitted by Paul Kincaid

Paul Kincaid was one of five rough-rousing, baseball hurling boys raised by the man memorialized in the book, E. Leon: A Perfectly Imperfect Dad.

E. Leon Kincaid was a traveling salesman who had grown up dirt poor during the Great Depression and raised his boys while also caring for his wife after her debilitating car accident.

Leon raised five sons in a Kansas City suburb, determined to not make the same mistakes his own father had made.

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

Elementary school kids form a line behind their teacher as they prepare to tour the House chamber in the Missouri Capitol building.

Statistically, about one in every nine of these kids will have a major depressive episode between the ages of 12 and 17, according to the Missouri Department of Mental Health.

State lawmakers, who draft laws that regulate and fund many mental health programs, just wrapped up their 2017 session.

More than half of Missouri’s counties don’t have a licensed psychiatrist, and nearly half don’t have a licensed psychologist.  

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

Until a few years ago, Addie Blankenship saw herself as a relatively healthy mom of three. She didn’t recognize that she was exhibiting symptoms of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder—a mental condition that leads to obsessive thoughts and compulsive actions.

“So I would spend hours and hours washing things. Or I would have a thought that something may be on my clothes, so I would change my clothes every time I’d have a bad thought, which sometimes was 10 times a day. Sometimes more,” Blankenship said.

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