Marideth Sisco

Host of "These Ozarks Hills"

Marideth is a Missouri storyteller, veteran journalist, teacher, author, musician and student of folklore focusing on stories relevant to Ozarks culture and history.  Each month, she’s the voice behind "These Ozarks Hills.” Sisco spent 20 years as an investigative and environmental writer for the West Plains Quill and was well known for her gardening column, “Crosspatch,” on which her new book is based. Sisco was a music consultant and featured singer in the 2010 award-winning feature film “Winter's Bone.”

http://www.gly.uga.edu/

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozarks Hills. A brand new year is upon us, one which fills some with great expectations and others with just as great trepidations. Here in the Ozarks, a recipe for a host of conditions is often just as simple as a walk in the woods. And thankfully, wind and weather permitting, we have a lot of woods we can walk in.

A Gesture of Peace

Dec 2, 2016
http://astronoteen.org/

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozarks Hills. Well, we’ve come to it again, the yearly descent into the long dark, an occasion that is as much metaphor as is the reality of day length. It won’t console us a bit that while we descend into winter, the southern hemisphere is just now entering spring, even though that’s the reason we are able to eat strawberries in January or cherries in March. They all come from the land down under – somewhere down under, as likely to be Chile as New Zealand.

Where's November?

Nov 4, 2016
commons.wikimedia.org

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozark Hills. I don’t know if you’ve noticed it, but November is here, and something’s just not right. There’s no wood smoke in the air, for one thing. And the trees haven’t had enough water to even change color before they fall. And as for the temperature, it may be in the 70s today, but just two days ago we were on the last of a string of days in the 80s. And it’s November, for heaven’s sake. Where do we think we are, Mississippi? This is supposed to be the Upper South. November 4th in the upper south, in case you don’t know it, is supposed to be cold.

http://edbookphoto.photoshelter.com/

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozarks Hills. I don’t know where it is you live, but out here in the rural Ozarks we’ve begun hearing whispers of fall this past week, as the Autumn Equinox has now passed and is receding into memory.

We feel a little spark of energy in the cooler and dryer air. The leaves of the black walnut are the first to fall and are doing so, revealing the harvest that is already beginning to pepper fencerows and the tin roof on the machine shed.

Peter Batemon

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozark Hills. If you’ve spent any time at all outdoors in the past couple of weeks, even as summer’s heat has been the most reliable measure of where we are in the seasons, I bet you’ve noticed as I have that little scraps and snippets of autumn have been slipping in, testing the waters, as it were, making us stop for a second and whisper under our breaths, Ah. That’ more like it. The mornings are cooler, the air sweeter, and that peculiar shift of the light is beginning to take hold, turning things just a little more golden.

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