Matt Campanelli

News Producer

Matt Campanelli is a senior at Missouri State University who is pursuing a degree in Journalism with a minor in Communications. While serving as a news intern for KSMU, Matt is also a staff reporter for Missouri State’s student run newspaper, The Standard. One of his favorite things about journalism is it combines two of his passions; writing and telling stories.

Matt Campanelli / KSMU

The Missouri Department of Conservation is working with duck hunters to help prevent the spread of invasive species in Missouri’s waterways.

Zebra mussels have been found in some of Missouri’s larger lakes like Truman, according to Kenda Flores with the MDC. Fellows Lake, a popular destination for duck hunters in Greene County, doesn’t have zebra mussels. However, Flores said the agency discovered the lake does have hydrilla, an aquatic plant and invasive species.

Ozarks Food Harvest
Ozarks Food Harvest website

Ozarks Food Harvest is teaming up with local businesses to help spread some holiday cheer this season with “25,000 Meals For Hope.” Like the name suggests, area businesses using the Towny app will attempt to collect that many meals for OFH.

The campaign is a new addition to the organization’s other annual holiday food drives such as Check Out Hunger.  

“This is a unique and fun thing we’re doing with Towny this year and we hope it brings in a lot of meals,” said Christine Temple, communication and public relations coordinator for Ozarks Food Harvest.

Bailey Vassalli / KSMU

Drury University has high expectations for the future look and feel of campus as part of its new master plan unveiled Monday.

Students, staff and university officials were on hand for the presentation showcasing the new 25 year strategy which includes new student housing, changes to streets on campus and renovations to existing buildings. Drury partnered with Cooper Robertson, a New York-based architecture and design firm, to develop the plan. Input was also sought from the university and Springfield communities.

Jack Ray / Center for Archaeology Research at Missouri State University

After running out of funds for a dig, Jack Ray is returning to the same sight two years later to see how much farther he can go. Ray, a research archaeologist with the Center for Archaeology Research at Missouri State University, has taught on and off for 33 years at MSU and teaches a field school in archaeology every summer.

Matt Campanelli / KSMU

Cars race by along Glenstone Avenue along the cemetery’s eastern boundary. Half a block to the west, where Seminole Street intersects Glenstone, you’ll find the cemetery’s main entrance. When closed, its two black gates read “U.S. National Cemetery.”

Inside, hundreds of Union and Confederate soldiers, many of whom were killed during the Battle of Wilson’s Creek, are buried here. Many of these soldiers share the same name: Unknown.