Mike Smith

News Producer, Host

Mike Smith's career at KSMU began in 1980 as a student announcer when the former Navy Submariner attended (then) SMSU with help from the GI Bill. In 1982 Smith became a full time member of the KSMU family as "Chief Announcer", responsible for the acquisition, training and scheduling of the student announcing staff. It was also in 1982 when Smith first produced "Seldom Heard Music" a broadcast of Bluegrass which is still heard on KSMU and ksmu.org every Saturday night at 7CT.

Until his retirement in 2006, Smith also served KSMU listeners as the stations Senior Producer and Director of News, receiving a 2005 Regional Edward R Murrow award for "Use of Sound" in a feature. Post retirement in a part time capacity, Smith produces the bi-monthly series Making A Difference Where You Live, and the business segments of KSMU's quarterly Sense of Community Series.

Ways to Connect

Mike Smith / KSMU-FM

A five member coalition of community partners, made public the 2017 Community Focus Report, October 24th at the Springfield Art Museum Auditorium. 

Since 2004, the biennial report card for Springfield and Greene County, has issued its own distinctive Blue Ribbons and Red Flags, to identify community strengths and challenges. 

Jonathan Groves

This story has been updated to include the full 2017 CFR, which was made public Tuesday morning. 

Scott Harvey KSMU

As KSMU's Sense of Community Series on the State of Civility In Our Community winds down, we're looking back several years at a then forward looking, and now on-going initiative. Be Civil Be Heard is designed to encourage and incorporate civil engagement in our community.

Elizabeth Dudash Buskirk, is a Communications Professor at Missouri State University, and Curator of Be Civil Be Heard, a not-for-profit partner of the Community Foundation of the Ozarks, currently administered out of the MSU Center For Community Engagement.  Dudash-Buskirk says the concept for Be Civil Be Heard, came after a series of contentious Springfield City Council meetings, several years ago: “I think it was somewhere between eight and ten years ago, the City Council and others in Springfield, really wanted to get a grip on having community conversation that was more civil than what was occurring.  They felt the city conversations were really problematic.”

Dr. Roger Ray

Springfield City Manager Greg Burris says the State of Civility in our Community is "Improving, but we need to be watchful."

Last month, when City officials learned President Trump was to visit Springfield, August 30th, one of the first things Burris did, was to shoot off a letter to the editor of the Springfield News-Leader.  Burris asked citizens and visitors to the city, supporters and protesters of the President, to be civil, courteous and polite to each other.

Community Foundation of the Ozarks

In May of 2016, The Community Foundation of the Ozarks announced Marshfield, Salem, and Sarcoxie, as the first 3 Missouri communities to receive CFO’s first ever Economic Development Grants, through the Growth in the Rural Ozarks, grand program.  GRO, as it is known, is designed to promote job creation, entrepreneurship, and economic and workforce development in rural communities.  Growth in the Rural Ozarks is Co-Funded by CFO and USDA Rural Development, and ov

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