Sarah Kellogg

Sarah Kellogg is a first year graduate student at the University of Missouri studying public affairs reporting. She spent her undergraduate days as a radio/television major and reported for KBIA. In addition to reporting shifts, Sarah also hosted KBIA’s weekly education show Exam, was an afternoon newscaster and worked on the True/False podcast. Growing up, Sarah listened to episodes of Wait Wait...Don’t Tell Me! with her parents during long car rides. It’s safe to say she was destined to end up in public radio. 


Current lawmakers win some and lose some under a proposal that would allow them to serve much longer in the legislature but prohibit them from taking lobbyists' gifts.

The legislation, which has already passed the Senate and was approved by a House committee Tuesday, includes a complete ban on all meals, tickets and other perks from lobbyists. It also includes a new form of term limits, but with a twist: Any lawmaker who was elected before Dec. 6, 2018 would be allowed to return to the Capitol for an additional 16 years.


A newly published Economic Impact report says that the University of Missouri System brings in over $5 billion dollars each year to the state of Missouri.


A House bill that limits how Missouri residents can spend temporary assistance funding received scrutiny during a Senate committee hearing Wednesday morning.

Nine people testified during a house committee meeting Tuesday evening, on behalf of a bill that would change how minors are charged with crimes.

The bill, which would be enacted in 2021, requires individuals under the age of 18 to be tried as juveniles for most crimes, unless they are certified as an adult.

Minors could still be charged as adults for violent or serious crimes such as murder or robbery.


The prospects for industrial hemp in Missouri are looking up this year.

Missouri Senators advanced a bill Tuesday that would create a pilot program in the state to study the growth, cultivation, processing and marketing of industrial hemp in cooperation with Missouri’s Department of Agriculture.


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