Theresa Bettman

News Producer, Announcer, Host

Theresa received her undergraduate degree in sociology at MSU, and now continues her education at MSU pursuing a Master's degree of Social Work. Theresa enjoys writing, drawing, reading, music, working with animals, and most of all spending time with her family. She wishes to use her experience, combined with her pursuit of education, to foster a sense of empowerment and social awareness in the community. Theresa loves working with KSMU and attributes her passion for NPR, and love of learning, to her father.

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Theresa Bettmann / KSMU

It’s nearing rush hour around dusk as I walk with Mary Kay Glunt. She’s not only the secretary of the Doling Neighborhood Association, but as she reminds me with a smile—also a neighbor.  We walk around the corner of Fort and Talmage—the area known as the Talmage Dip, just one of the many infrastructure improvement projects underway as part of the Zone Blitz.  

Theresa Bettmann / KSMU

Republicans held off a Democratic takeover of the U.S. Senate Tuesday, and in doing so voted back incumbents like Sen. Roy Blunt of Missouri.

Blunt took to the stage at the Ramada Oasis Convention Center in Springfield right around midnight Tuesday shortly after Democrat Jason Kander called him to concede.

“What a competition it was, how sweet it is to win, but particularly how sweet it is to win and be part of what is happening in our state,” Blunt says.

Theresa Bettmann / KSMU

It’s just after 8:00 am on a Friday morning and I’m surrounded by 17 area high school juniors and seniors, dressed in business-casual attire and reflecting upon their week. This is the first day back in their typical GO CAPS classroom after spending the previous four days on site at Springfield businesses.  The group has been learning important aspects of professionalism, and what these businesses have to offer in engineering and manufacturing.  One of those students is Wyatt Comstock.

Theresa Bettmann / KSMU

Five years ago, this section of Joplin was littered with debris after an EF-5 tore through the city, killing 161 people. Today, the area known as “ground zero” at Cunningham Park has been rebuilt with many memorials, a children’s play area, and peaceful Butterfly Garden and overlook.

Scott Harvey / KSMU

This once popular road, as described by Troy Banzhaf, was equivalent to modern-day highways as it connected several states and was highly traveled. A portion of this road is also infamous in the role it played in a dark time in history. Banzhaf is the chief of interpretation at Pea Ridge National Military Park in Garfield, Arkansas. This site is best known for its Civil War history and the battle that occurred there in 1862.

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