Theresa Bettman

News Producer, Announcer, Host

Theresa received her undergraduate degree in sociology at Missouri State University, as well as her  Master's degree in Social Work at MSU. Theresa enjoys writing, drawing, reading, music, working with animals, and most of all spending time with her family. She wishes to continue to use her experiences, combined with her pursuit of education, to foster a sense of empowerment and social awareness in the community. Theresa loves working with KSMU and attributes her passion for NPR, and love of learning, to her father.

Theresa Bettmann / KSMU

Meet Paul and Debbie Rollison, both longtime KSMU listeners. We counted seven mugs and pint glasses containing the KSMU label – new and old versions – on a recent visit to their Springfield home.

It’s there that Paul introduced us to his “Old Harman Kardon receiver that I bought in the early eighties.”

Paul, a native of Great Britain, lived in Champaign, Illinois before moving to Springfield in 1987. He brought the audio receiver with him, and soon after the Harmon Kardon was introduced to KSMU’s FM frequency.

Theresa Bettmann / KSMU

I am being transported into another world through the use of a head mounted display (HMD), moving about a computer-generated building created by a second-year architecture student. David Beach, assistant professor of architecture at Drury University, explains this is just one of the many innovative techniques used as part of a program where students can virtually navigate their own designs.

Ellen Neville
Theresa Bettmann / KSMU

For Ellen Neville, listening to KSMU is common practice while making art. She says the station helps her listen to stories because it "keeps my brain involved and engaged."

In the mornings, she frequently starts her day with NPR's Morning Edition, heard weekdays on KSMU.

"That kind of gets me started for the day and gets my brain going," Neville says.

Road closed sign
Theresa Bettmann / KSMU

It’s nearing rush hour around dusk as I walk with Mary Kay Glunt. She’s not only the secretary of the Doling Neighborhood Association, but as she reminds me with a smile—also a neighbor.  We walk around the corner of Fort and Talmage—the area known as the Talmage Dip, just one of the many infrastructure improvement projects underway as part of the Zone Blitz.  

Theresa Bettmann / KSMU

Republicans held off a Democratic takeover of the U.S. Senate Tuesday, and in doing so voted back incumbents like Sen. Roy Blunt of Missouri.

Blunt took to the stage at the Ramada Oasis Convention Center in Springfield right around midnight Tuesday shortly after Democrat Jason Kander called him to concede.

“What a competition it was, how sweet it is to win, but particularly how sweet it is to win and be part of what is happening in our state,” Blunt says.

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