Theresa Bettman

News Producer, Announcer, Host

Theresa received her undergraduate degree in sociology at Missouri State University, as well as her  Master's degree in Social Work at MSU. Theresa enjoys writing, drawing, reading, music, working with animals, and most of all spending time with her family. She wishes to continue to use her experiences, combined with her pursuit of education, to foster a sense of empowerment and social awareness in the community. Theresa loves working with KSMU and attributes her passion for NPR, and love of learning, to her father.

Ozark Police Department
Scott Harvey / KSMU

The city of Ozark has began soliciting applications for its next chief of police. This week’s job posting comes after the recent resignation of Lyle Hodges, who was reprimanded in May after a report alleging misconduct within the department. 

City Administrator Steve Childers tells KSMU that the biggest thing Ozark is looking for in a new chief is leadership, and for someone who will be “very engaged.”

Theresa Bettmann / KSMU

Opponents of a food labeling bill in the U.S. House expressed their frustration Thursday outside of Republican Rep. Billy Long’s office in Springfield.

Introduced in March, HB 1599 seeks “to amend the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act with respect to food produced from, containing, or consisting of a bioengineered organism, the labeling of natural foods, and for other purposes.”

Scott Harvey / KSMU

On Wednesday, a non-smoking ordinance went into effect in Branson prohibiting the practice in many public spaces where it was once allowed.  KSMU’s Theresa Bettmann has reaction from local businesses.

Nicholas Carter / KSMU

Built in 1929, the Lyric Theatre in downtown Harrison, Arkansas originally served as a venue for “talkies.”  Talkies came after silent pictures and were the first films to incorporate dialog, music and other forms of sound along with the film. Over the years the theatre has experienced several changes, but for many people it remains a vital part of the community’s history, culture and memories. 

Wilson's Creek NPS

Wilson’s Creek Battlefield is well recognized for its link to the site of the third major battle of the Civil War, which happened on these grounds in 1861.  The National Park Service cares for and maintains this historic land.  But as Ted Hillmer, superintendent for the NPS at Wilson’s Creek explains, there is much more here to preserve and share.

“It is a national battlefield, but it is also a cultural resource.  And because it is a cultural resource there’s things out here that we want to preserve,” Hillmer says.

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