Engaging the Community

Every third Friday at 7:30 a.m.

This monthly program features Missouri State University President Clif Smart discussing the implications of national and international events on the University and local community. Join us as we look at current events and public affairs through a local lens. You can also email topic suggestions for this program.

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Scott Harvey / KSMU

It’s the first time in five years that the Missouri General Assembly has increased funding appropriations for Missouri State University. As KSMU’s Scott Harvey reports, the additional $25 million lawmakers set aside for higher education, which still awaits the signature of Gov. Nixon, means an additional $2.4 million for MSU.

Scott Harvey / KSMU

With severe weather season on the horizon, education administrators are among the officials analyzing current procedures ahead of any potential storms.

At Missouri State University, those who sign up for the school’s notification system will be alerted of, among other things, inclement weather which could affect university operations. The practice is not uncommon these days, with smartphones offering immediate and advanced notifications.

New funding for higher education is among the proposals this year from Gov. Jay Nixon, who said during his State of the State address in January he’d like to dedicate $34 million to the state’s colleges and universities based on their performance.

For Missouri State University, that means an additional 4.3 percent in funding, or roughly $3.3 million, for achieving all five performance measures.

Efforts to make a business more efficient to keep pace with the changing times and climate is nothing new. At Missouri State University, officials say the recent addition of a chilled water loop is one example, helping save on air conditioning costs. But its reliance on coal has many asking what other sources can be used instead.

In December, students urged the Board of Governors to focus on wind, solar and geothermal technology to derive 100 percent of its energy from renewable sources. So is that possible?

Missouri State University President Clif Smart says roughly 50 percent of the school’s graduates have a job lined up before they receive their diploma.

Citing figures compiled by the institution’s Career Center, the President says there’s been more job activity this time around than the last couple of years. The ascent has been rather slow, however.

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