Here and Now

Monday-Thursday, 1-3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered.  Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

For more than a century, the designers of tall buildings have used mostly concrete and steel. But advances in structural engineering have sparked new interest among architects in one of the world’s oldest building materials: wood.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Michael Green, a Vancouver-based architect who says wood is just as strong as concrete or steel — and more sustainable.

Robert Finley is not your average new artist.

At 63, the north Louisiana blues and soul musician has already lived a lifetime. He served as a helicopter serviceman in the Army in the ’70s and worked as a carpenter for decades until he started to lose his sight a few years ago.

Unable to continue working, Finley fell back on his dream: singing and playing guitar.

America is experiencing an unprecedented opioid epidemic.

On average, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says 78 people die from an opioid-related overdose every day. Prevention and treatment are key to fighting the crisis and new, innovative ideas in both areas are gaining traction in Boston after an opioid “hack-athon.”

Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with two of the hack-athon winners, Scott Strode and Aubri Esters, about the impact they hope to have with their projects.

Some say a new housing crisis is developing. Rising prices mean home ownership is now nearly impossible for young families saddled with student debt.

It’s a problem in places like Seattle and Denver, where there are a lot of college graduates as well as the fastest growing home prices.

Ben Markus from Here & Now contributor Colorado Public Radio explains.

As presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump get ready for their first debate Monday night, Here & Now looks at some of the highlights in the history of presidential debates.

The first Clinton-Trump debate falls on the anniversary of the first-ever televised presidential debate, between Republican Richard Nixon and Democrat John F. Kennedy, on Sept. 26, 1960.

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