Here and Now

Monday-Thursday, 1-3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered.  Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

Across the nation, hospitals are paying fines to the government when patients are readmitted to the hospital within 30 days. That can cost medical centers millions and doctors are looking for ways to reduce that readmission rate.

As Casey Kuhn from Here & Now contributor KJZZ reports, one rural city in Arizona has kept patients out of the hospital by sending paramedics to their homes.

It’s been a mixed bag for retail so far this year, with announcements from Macy’s and Wal-Mart of store closings, while online shopping numbers continue to tick up. As the market finds its balance, some customers have fewer and fewer options when it comes to shopping.

Neil Saunders, managing director of the retail research firm Conlumino, talks with Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti about why some parts of the U.S. might become “retail deserts.”

In Washington D.C., one of the places to find movers and shakers is The Bombay Club, a block from the White House. For nearly 30 years at The Bombay Club, turbaned waiters with white gloves have been serving refined Indian dishes to presidents, as well as tourists, long before Indian food became popular in the U.S.

When the sanctions on Iran were lifted earlier this month, as a result of the nuclear deal, we also got news that four Americans would be released from Iran, as part of a prisoner swap. Separate from that swap, another American, Matthew Trevithick, was being released.

Avoid Tax Identity Theft By Filing Early

Jan 28, 2016

Another reason to dread tax season: the Internal Revenue Service says it paid out $63 billion in fraudulent tax refunds between 2011 and 2014. That means someone posing as you could walk away with a refund check with your name on it.

Shawn Novak teaches tax policy at Arizona State University. He’s also a former tax adviser for the U.S. Senate Finance Committee. He joins Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd to discuss the problem, and ways to avoid becoming a victim.

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