Here and Now

Monday-Thursday, 1-3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered.  Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

Britain's Pound Hits Historic Lows

Oct 12, 2016

The British pound hit a historic low Tuesday, touching a worth of $1.20, down from $1.55 last year.

The drop was brought on by continuing fears about Britain’s impending exit from the European Union.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Sebastian Payne of the Financial Times about the drop, and the latest in the Brexit negotiations.

The continuing flow into the U.S. of Central American families and youth fleeing violence has prompted the Obama administration to expand an asylum program that protects some of these migrants.

The move is getting mixed reviews in the Washington area, home to thousands of Salvadorans. And as Armando Trull from Here & Now contributor WAMU reports, the changes come too late for one Maryland father.

Samsung is permanently ending production of its signature Galaxy Note 7 after more reports of the smartphone catching fire.

The electronics giant previously called on carriers to stop selling the phone, but now it says it will take more drastic steps while it investigates the problem. The move leaves Samsung without a high-end model to rival Apple’s iPhone 7, and may cause headaches for millions of customers.

It can be tricky to determine, with any certainty, where the candidates stand on the issues, including on issues of science.

That’s why, for the second presidential election cycle in a row, Scientific American magazine has partnered with to pose 20 questions to the candidates — questions that were developed and refined by dozens of scientific organizations that represent more than 10 million scientists.

The 2005 video of an offensive and lewd conversation between Donald Trump and Access Hollywood’s then-host Billy Bush stirred outrage and several endorsement reversals.

It has also presented some tricky questions for NBC, which announced it is suspending Billy Bush from his current position as anchor on the “Today” show.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik about how the scandal is playing out for the media company and its staff.