Sense of Place

Profiling historical people, places and things throughout the Ozarks. Until recently, Sense of Place had been a long-running series on KSMU. We're re-launching the series in August 2017 to capture unique stories on history throughout our region. Below, see archives of our reports from over the years.

Matt Campanelli / KSMU

Cars race by along Glenstone Avenue along the cemetery’s eastern boundary. Half a block to the west, where Seminole Street intersects Glenstone, you’ll find the cemetery’s main entrance. When closed, its two black gates read “U.S. National Cemetery.”

Inside, hundreds of Union and Confederate soldiers, many of whom were killed during the Battle of Wilson’s Creek, are buried here. Many of these soldiers share the same name: Unknown.

Richard Crabtree
Ryan Welch / KSMU

So you’re in the market for a new home, or just bought one, and curious about its history. When was it built? Who were its previous occupants? Most sellers would have some of this information, but would that tell the whole story? Richard Crabtree is a realtor with Murney Associates in Springfield who, in addition to his day job, spends countless hours digging up historical data on properties. In fact, the back of his business card reads “Realtor – Historian – Restorer.”

Michele Skalicky

A monument, installed nearly 100 years ago and marking explorer Henry Rowe Schoolcraft’s journey in the 19th Century to the area that’s now Springfield, is now accessible to the public.  

When explorer, Henry Rowe Schoolcraft, arrived at what is now Springfield in early January, 1818, the land was yet unspoiled.  He described prairie grass so tall that a man could ride a horse through it without being seen.

Mike Smith / KSMU-FM

KSMU Producer Mike Smith:  “As the KSMU Sense of Community continues to celebrate the Centennial Year of the National Park Service, we travel a little over 140 miles east of Springfield to Van Buren Missouri, where the Headquarters of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways is located.  ONSR was created by an act of Congress in 1964 to protect and preserve the Current and Jacks Fork Rivers.”

Mike Smith / KSMU-FM

Audio:  As we enter the building a large wooden door closes, followed by the voice of Holly Baker: 

“We are in what used to be the 2nd Infantry Barracks, but right now is serving as our museum and theater.  And this is where we have our brand new exhibit The Fight Over Freedom, the story of Ft. Scott during The Bleeding Kansas and the Civil War periods”

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