Sense of Place

Profiling historical people, places and things throughout the Ozarks. Until recently, Sense of Place had been a long-running series on KSMU. We re-launched the series in August 2017 to capture unique stories on history throughout our region. Below, see recent reports and archives from over the years.

Mike Smith / KSMU-FM

For the KSMU Sense of Community series, I’m Mike Smith….

Just south of Branson, in Point Lookout Missouri where I talked to Kansas City resident Joan Scatt about her just completed visit to the Smithsonian of the Ozarks, The Ralph Foster Museum.   “It was highly educational, very informative, very well put together and I enjoyed it very much.  We’ve been in there 2 and a half hours and have to come back.  My favorites were the cameos and the stones, but I’m excited to see a (Rose O’Neill) Kewpie Doll for the first time, and I’m 68 years old”.  

Anna Skalicky

Eureka Springs has a long and fascinating history.  In this segment of KSMU's Sense of Community Series, KSMU's Michele Skalicky goes on a walking tour of an entire town that has been designated as an Historic Preservation District.

Ralph Wilson is working to keep the history of historic Eureka Springs, Arkansas alive by sharing stories about the city.  The Denver native, who came to the Northwest Arkansas in 2006, is one of two people who get paid to give tours of historic downtown.

Michele Skalicky / KSMU

Two local organizations are keeping alive the amazing accomplishments of a woman who helped pave the way for female artists.  In this segment of KSMU's Sense of Community Series, Michele Skalicky takes us to Bonniebrook and to the Rose O'Neill Museum.

Set along a flowing stream, complete with waterfalls in the middle of the Ozarks woods, it’s easy to see why Rose O’Neill loved Bonniebrook.

Nicholas Carter / KSMU

Built in 1929, the Lyric Theatre in downtown Harrison, Arkansas originally served as a venue for “talkies.”  Talkies came after silent pictures and were the first films to incorporate dialog, music and other forms of sound along with the film. Over the years the theatre has experienced several changes, but for many people it remains a vital part of the community’s history, culture and memories. 

Wilson's Creek NPS

Wilson’s Creek Battlefield is well recognized for its link to the site of the third major battle of the Civil War, which happened on these grounds in 1861.  The National Park Service cares for and maintains this historic land.  But as Ted Hillmer, superintendent for the NPS at Wilson’s Creek explains, there is much more here to preserve and share.

“It is a national battlefield, but it is also a cultural resource.  And because it is a cultural resource there’s things out here that we want to preserve,” Hillmer says.

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