These Ozarks Hills

The first Friday of every month at 7:30 a.m.

Join us for a monthly radio essay by longtime Ozarks storyteller Marideth Sisco, in which she looks at the unique traditions and traits of this region we call home.

Great White Ninja Production

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozarks Hills. As I’ve been searching for a subject on which to hold forth this month, I keep coming back to the word Vagary. It’s from the Latin vagari "to wander, to roam, to be unsettled, or be spread abroad.” Its most modern usage is, of course, the word vagrant. it’s easy to see how that fits with the original definition of the noun vagāri, to be a wanderer.

http://www.smithsonianmag.com

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozarks Hills. April is upon us, with its tumultuous climate and treacherous weather, and we reflect again on the pronouncement of more than one Ozarker who said “If you don’t like the Ozarks weather, just give it a minute. It’ll change.

In Like A Lion

Mar 3, 2017
https://nationalzoo.si.edu/animals/lion

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozark Hills. Well, as the folks in Perry County can tell you, there’s no question that March in the Ozarks came in like the proverbial lion. In ordinary times we would be confident in assuming that It will likewise go out as a lamb. But as nearly everyone can tell you, these are not in any way normal times. And about that, there’s either too very much to say, or nothing at all.

http://www.gly.uga.edu/

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozarks Hills. A brand new year is upon us, one which fills some with great expectations and others with just as great trepidations. Here in the Ozarks, a recipe for a host of conditions is often just as simple as a walk in the woods. And thankfully, wind and weather permitting, we have a lot of woods we can walk in.

A Gesture of Peace

Dec 2, 2016
http://astronoteen.org/

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozarks Hills. Well, we’ve come to it again, the yearly descent into the long dark, an occasion that is as much metaphor as is the reality of day length. It won’t console us a bit that while we descend into winter, the southern hemisphere is just now entering spring, even though that’s the reason we are able to eat strawberries in January or cherries in March. They all come from the land down under – somewhere down under, as likely to be Chile as New Zealand.

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