These Ozarks Hills

The first Friday of every month at 7:30 a.m.

Join us for a monthly radio essay by longtime Ozarks storyteller Marideth Sisco, in which she looks at the unique traditions and traits of this region we call home.

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozark Hills. There’s a certain comfort in being able to predict reliably and in advance just when that tree is going to fall, that rock face is going to collapse, the other shoe will drop. But I don’t know that that would be a good thing. I think that for me if the warning came, I wouldn’t be paying attention –or rather I’d be too rapt in attention to something else. Like that saying that “Life is the thing that happens while you’re otherwise engaged.” Ah yes. So much of life just races by, Sonie Rutstein of Disappear Fear, says. And it’s true.

www.si.edu

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozarks Hills. No matter where we live or in what circumstances, and no matter what life throws at us or how determinedly we walk our own path, it takes a while to determine which kinds of destinations at which we arrive are something that was optional, something we might or might not have come to, or whether it has turned out to be somehow inevitable. Relationships, for instance, for the most part are optional. We can end up in them or out of them mostly as a matter of choice.

commons.wikimedia.org

TOH 2-18

usda.gov

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozark Hills. Sad to say, but I guess we’ve seen the last of the gardens for this year. And as this post falls a little too late for Halloween and way too early for snarky remarks about Black Friday and the Christmas decorations already on sale , I’m left to dream up my own topics. That’s seldom a good idea because I’m old and I tend to wander off. So far, though, I’ve been able to find my way back. And that’s just what I’ve done. Because even as I said the words I knew in my very soul that we, or at least I, had not seen the last of the garden.

Native Notions

Oct 6, 2017
wikipedia.org

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozarks Hills. This spate of dry Autumn days has gotten me thinking about the whimsical Ozarks climate and remembering other seasons and what folks said about them. Natives, mostly. And by that I don’t mean those born here. I mean the original natives. Now, I don’t know that I look all that much Native American, even though I am about a quarter’s worth. But sooner or later someone, usually someone with some Native American ancestry and often someone I don’t know, will come up to me out of the blue and tell me something I need to know.

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