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Articles in Arts And Entertainment

In the new play The Library, Chloë Grace Moretz is a teen who survives a school shooting, only to discover she's been accused of aiding the shooter.

The Library — directed by Steven Soderbergh — is a new play that confronts the topic of school shootings head on, peering into the shattered lives of the survivors and the stories they tell.

Martin Freeman as Lester Nygaard in FX's Fargo.

It's easy to be skeptical of a TV series inspired by the brilliant film Fargo, but the FX adaptation is dark, funny, free-standing and a great big hoot.

Father and sons walk through a dust storm in Cimarron County, Okla. (1936) Steinbeck writes: "The dust was evenly mixed with the air, an emulsion of dust and air. Houses were shut tight, and cloth wedged around doors and windows, but the dust came in so thinly that it could not be seen in the air, and it settled like pollen on the chairs and tables, on the dishes."

The I-Will-If-You-Will Book Club just finished reading John Steinbeck's Dust Bowl saga. We'll be hanging out in the comments with Steinbeck expert Susan Shillinglaw to talk about the book's legacy.

Kristen Wiig plays Johanna Parry in Hateship Loveship, adapted from an Alice Munro short story.

A new film starring Kristen Wiig adapts an Alice Munro short story, filling in huge swaths of negative space that Munro left. But surprisingly, in telling more of the story, the film loses something.

Also: Sue Townsend was writing another Adrian Mole novel at the time of her death; the best books coming out this week.

Don Draper (Jon Hamm) has a lot on his mind as the new season of Mad Men gets underway.

Monday water cooler TV is the return of Mad Men. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans dissects the thing fans will be talking about Monday morning: what's become of Don Draper's career.

Father and sons walk through a dust storm in Cimarron County, Okla. (1936) Steinbeck writes: "The dust was evenly mixed with the air, an emulsion of dust and air. Houses were shut tight, and cloth wedged around doors and windows, but the dust came in so thinly that it could not be seen in the air, and it settled like pollen on the chairs and tables, on the dishes."

John Steinbeck's Dust Bowl story is "about haves and have-nots," says one scholar, "and that story is getting increasingly urgent." The book was first published April 14, 1939.

John Cusack and Ione Skye in Say Anything.

Cameron Crowe's much-loved film turns 25 this week, and unlike a lot of high-school films of its day, it's aged surprisingly well.

Daily life has slowly been changing in Cuba, since Fidel Castro ceded power in 2006 to his brother Raul, who became president in 2008.

NPR

American Julia Cooke documented the ways Cuba has changed since Fidel Castro ceded authority to his brother. During her travels, she says, everything she thought she knew was "blown out of the water."