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Articles in Politics

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich waves after addressing the Conservative Political Action Conference annual meeting in National Harbor, Md., on March 8.

Topping the list of the former GOP presidential candidate's creditors is a air charter company called Moby Dick Airways. The second biggest creditor? Newt Gingrich himself.

Colorado Republican Congressman Cory Gardner after he announced his candidacy for U.S. Senate in March. He's challenging incumbent Democratic Sen. Mark Udall.

When Democrats took control of Colorado's statehouse, they pushed through gun control, civil unions and environmental bills. Then voters pushed back, and Sen. Mark Udall is feeling the fallout.

NPR

IRS Commissioner John Koskinen discusses the challenges of running the government's tax collection arm, in the face of sequestration cuts and congressional scrutiny.

While the Congressional Budget Office has lowered its shortfall projections for the next few years, it warns that deficits will start rising substantially again unless policymakers act.

If anything, 2014 has been marked with a flurry of show votes. Those are votes on bills that have no realistic hope of passing Congress, but are done to make political points.

Rep. Vance McAllister, R-La., being sworn in by Speaker John Boehner as wife Kelly holds the Bible.

As of this writing, Rep. Vance McAllister is still a congressman representing his northeastern Louisiana district. And that's part of the problem for a GOP establishment that would like him gone.

NPR

Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss Kathleen Sebelius' resignation, Jeb Bush's immigration comments and the civil rights anniversary.

Barack Obama and George W. Bush, two U.S. presidents with little in common in terms of policy, personal style and politics, each paid tribute to the legacy of President Lyndon Johnson.

The move comes about 6 months after the disastrous roll out of the health insurance website. It was eventually fixed, but not before delivering a severe blow to the president's approval ratings.