Arts News

Every Friday morning, Randy Stewart talks with artists, performers, directors and administrators from the area visual and performing arts scene, and presents a comprehensive calendar of arts events.

(Logo courtesy www.messiahproject.org)

Messiah Project, Inc.

(Photo courtesy www.springfieldjazzfestival.com)

The 5th annual Springfield Jazz Festival will present a full evening-long jazz festival on two stages around Park Central Square in downtown Springfield, featuring various local artists along with nationally known headliner, trumpeter and jazz educator Bob Lark, performing with the Missouri Jazz Orchestra.  The date is Friday October 3rd, and it's FREE and open to the public.

(Logo courtesy Drury University)

The Drury University Department of Theatre will present "Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead " by Bert V. Royal, an "unauthorized parody" of Charles Schultz's "Peanuts" characters. Directed by Madison Spencer, the play opens on Wednesday, October 1st at 7:30 p.m. in the Studio Theatre inside Springfield Hall on the Drury campus. Good grief!

(Logo courtesy www.manhattanshort.com)

Springfield…you be the judge!  Local filmgoers will unite with audiences in over 250 cities spanning six continents to view and judge the work of the next generation of world filmmakers during the 17th annual Manhattan Short Film Festival.  Plaster Student Union at Missouri State University is the ONLY location in Missouri participating in the annual festival, which will take place Saturday Sept.27 at 7:00pm.  This year Manhattan Short received nearly 600 short-film entries from 47 countries, and the ten finalists come from England, Norway, Australia, Netherlands, France, Mexico, Germany an

(Photo: www.museumoflondonprints.com)

The Springfield Art Museum will host the inaugural “Box of Ghosts: The 99 Times Party” to support preservation of a historical textile collection discovered during the museum’s recent inventory. Staff discovered a number of exceptional dresses and other textile pieces, some dating back as far as the late 1700s.

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