Biology department

If you suffer from migraine or other orofacial pain like TMD, it's no surprise that poor sleep routines, stress, lack of exercise and a sedentary desk job all increase your risk for these painful events.

Ligon with alligator snapping turtle
Submitted by Dr. Day Ligon

Conducting research to aid the conservation of a species whose numbers have declined is often challenging precisely because they are scarce. For animals that are naturally secretive, they are even more difficult to detect and therefore study. One such species is the alligator snapping turtle which after decades of population decline has been petitioned for federal listing as an endangered species three times. These large turtles are of particular interest to Dr.

In February of 2016, the U.S. struck a deal with the Cuban government to resume scheduled flights between the two countries. Now, for the first time in Missouri State University's history, a group of students took a winter intercession course in the long banned island.  I'm Nicki Donnelson and today my guests are Dr. Alexander Wait, professor of biology at Missouri State, and Ericka Fetner, microbiology student. They are here to share about the experience of visiting Cuba in the course, The History, Culture and Ecology of Cuba: Past, Present and Future. 

Under rocks and logs, in burrows and underwater, Dr. Alicia Mathis finds fascinating creatures to study. Mathis, head of the biology department at Missouri State University, focuses her research on the behaviors of tiny amphibians and fish. 

One of the most common things these animals need to communicate about is predation risk. It’s been understood for awhile that alarm cues are received and understood by animals of the same species and of different species – imagine a minnow and a stickleback – but her lab has uncovered some surprising results.

 

As you head outdoors during the spring and summer, bask in the beauty of the Ozarks. In the local area we are surrounded by many opportunities to get in touch with nature, by hiking, canoeing, camping and a myriad of other activities.

This is the first in a two part series looking at animals that surround us here in southwest Missouri.

Dr. Brian Greene, herpetologist at Missouri State University, explains his research, and his interest in snakes.

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