Biomedical Sciences

November is American Diabetes Month. This disease affects more than 30 million Americans.

Natalie Allen, clinical instructor of dietetics in the biomedical sciences department at Missouri State University, helps to raise  awareness of the benefits of proper nutrition.

But first she explains some of the foods that are typically high in glucose. Although most vegetables don’t metabolize into glucose, she reminds us to beware of these starchy veggies.

Let’s face it: Infectious diseases are scary. On a personal level, we want to avoid them and want to protect our loved ones as well. If you’re in a health care profession, you’re much more likely to be exposed. Then, professionally, you run the risk of cross-contamination if you’re not taking all proper precautions.

In the health and athletics world, the word train means to practice in order to improve. But in the world of Special Olympics athletes, it means so much more, thanks to a group of students and faculty from Missouri State University. This interdisciplinary group from kinesiology, special education, dietetics, graphic design and computer science developed TRAIN, Testing Recreation Activities and Improving Nutrition, in 2009 and 2010.

  The possibility of curing fatal diseases, such as cancer, may be closer than we think.

Dr. Robert Delong, associate professor of biomedical sciences at Missouri State University, and his group of students are interested in Ribonucleic Acids (RNA) targeting, a very rapidly developing field in science.

Like DNA, RNA can be manipulated and designed to produce a variety of different nanostructures. RNA, however, is a more flexible structure that can fold into numerous complicated configurations.