College of Health and Human Services

Stress is natural and unavoidable. It is your reaction that you can control. One method of coping with stress is through meditation – and it is easier to introduce into your routine than you may assume. 

 

With the joy of the holidays also comes stress. It hits you from all sides: gift-giving, financial burdens, crowded malls, packed calendars.

 

It all adds up.  

Are you sitting down? The Calorie Control Council has estimated that Americans consume nearly 4,500 calories on Thanksgiving Day each year. Approximately 3,000 will be on your dinner plate, while drinks, snacks and desserts will stuff you with the remaining 1,500.

Natalie Allen, clinical instructor of dietetics in the biomedical sciences department at Missouri State University, gives us a few tips for identifying hidden high calorie items.

November is American Diabetes Month. This disease affects more than 30 million Americans.

Natalie Allen, clinical instructor of dietetics in the biomedical sciences department at Missouri State University, helps to raise  awareness of the benefits of proper nutrition.

But first she explains some of the foods that are typically high in glucose. Although most vegetables don’t metabolize into glucose, she reminds us to beware of these starchy veggies.

This past summer, Missouri State University student Madeline Hayes embarked on a journey she would never forget.

She left the comforts of home to help those who are suffering in one of the world’s most dangerous cities – Mosul, Iraq.

A senior nursing major, Hayes spent a month in Mosul with Free Burma Rangers (FBR), a humanitarian service movement founded by David Eubank, a former U.S. Special Forces operative. FBR provides aid in the conflict areas of Burma, Iraq and Sudan.

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