CoxHealth

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A heat advisory is in effect starting at noon today and going through tomorrow evening.  That means a period of hot temperatures is expected., and the heat and humidity could lead to heat illnesses, according to the National Weather Service.  It’s offering suggestions for staying safe including drinking plenty of fluids, staying in air conditioning and staying out of the sun if possible.  Check on relatives and neighbors.  If you have to work outside, take frequent breaks.

According to CoxHealth, common signs of heat-related illness are: 

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Going into combat or experiencing other traumatic incidents can lead to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and other issues.  A series of classes, which start tomorrow, is targeted at those at risk—military veterans and first responders.

Kerry Miller, volunteer coordinator at CoxHealth, said Wellness for Warriors will use things like yoga and relationship building to help people learn to cope with the changes they’ve experienced.

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If you haven’t been checked for skin cancer in a while—or ever—and you think you might be at risk, you can sign up for a free screening this weekend.  KSMU’s Michele Skalicky tells us more.

There are basically two types of skin cancer:  non-melanomas and melanomas.  Autumn Bragg, community oncology educator at CoxHealth, said non-melanomas often look like abrasions or pimples that won’t heal.

"Something that may bleed over and over again, something you've had for weeks.  Sometimes they can be like a raised, reddish patch that's itchy," she said.

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There’s an app for lots of things these days, and now CoxHealth is offering an app for expectant parents.

The health system’s BabyBeginnings smartphone app is being called “a one-stop source for medically-founded information from conception to birth and beyond.”

Dr. Staci Niemoth (NEE-muth), medical director of Women’s Services at CoxHealth, says expectant moms always have questions about the changes they’re experiencing, and this app gives them vetted information that’s available at the touch of a button.

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A new partnership between CoxHealth and the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis will make things easier for women with infertility issues.  KSMU’s Michele Skalicky has more.

The new partnership is expected to reduce travel expenses and the amount of time away from work for women seeking treatment for infertility.

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