CoxHealth

Scott Harvey / KSMU

Cox College is celebrating its newest edition to assist its occupational therapy students with the opening of a new training facility.  

Cox Cottage, as it’s being called, is a roughly 900-square foot ADL (Activities of Daily Living) apartment unit inside Cox North that allow students to learn how to help patients with everyday skills such as cooking, vacuuming, eating, bathing and even sleeping.

Submitted Photo / MU Health

Effective Monday, Dr. Andrew J. Evans will head the Springfield Clinical Campus through the University of Missouri’s School of Medicine. Evans was recently named associate dean and chief academic officer for the program, which begins welcoming students in June. 

Dr. Linda Headrick, a professor of Medicine at MU, says Evans is uniquely positioned to lead the campus.

“He’s had a personal direct experience in all three of the partner organizations; The Missouri University School of Medicine, CoxHealth in Springfield, and Mercy Health System in Springfield.”

Zika Virus
CDC

Talks of the Zika Virus continue to grow, with the World Health Organization declaring it a "public health emergency of international concern.” But what exactly is the Zika Virus?

Cindy Robertson, the Infection Prevention director at CoxHealth, explains.

“The Zika Virus is a single-stranded RNA virus. It is closely related to Dengue, Yellow Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and West Nile Virus, and it is transmitted to humans by the Aedes species mosquito.”

St. Jude

A device that’s new in Springfield can help keep heart patients out of the hospital, and all they have to do is lie on a pillow for a few seconds once a day.  KSMU’s Michele Skalicky has more.

CoxHealth is using a new procedure to monitor heart patients.  The method consists of a sensor that’s implanted in a patient’s pulmonary artery, which is located just outside the heart.

"And what that does is it literally senses the pressure, and we can therefore track changes of the pressure in the lungs," said Dr. Stephen Kuehn, cardiologist with CoxHealth. 

bostonscientific.com

Patients in southwest Missouri who suffer from atrial fibrillation now have another option when it comes to reducing their risk of stroke.  KSMU's Michele Skalicky has more.

A device called a Watchman, approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the last year, is now being offered at CoxHealth.

The tiny device—just two to three centimeters—is implanted in the left atrial appendage and prevents clots from forming in the out pouch of the heart.

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