General Election 2016

Missouri will have a new secretary of state in January, because incumbent Democrat Jason Kander is running for the U.S. Senate. Barring a third-party upset, his successor will be a Republican with a last name very familiar to Missourians, or a Democrat known mainly to St. Louis-area TV viewers. 

Nine years ago, Chris Koster was a state senator, a former Cass County prosecutor and a rising star within the Missouri Republican Party. Many speculated he would eventually run for governor.

And now he is running for governor, but as a Democrat.

Koster switched parties in 2007,  a stunning move that has set the course for his unusual political career.  He remains the highest-profile politician in Missouri, at least in modern times, to have made such a move

MSU Debate Watch Party
Han Zhao

The third and final presidential debate is over.  Dr. Eric Morris, Missouri State University debate coach and communications professor, offered his views on last night’s event.

"As a presidential debate scholar I'll say that tonight probably did not have a significant impact on the election.  The effect that debates have on the election tends to be very short-term.  It is like any number of things that can happen in a campaign.  It creates some impressions, some significant moments, but often the give and take of the next few days will cancel out that sort of an effect," he said.

It’s mid-afternoon in a VFW Hall in Overland, and Eric Greitens has a room full of veterans at full attention. Two Medal of Honor recipients, Michael Thornton and Thomas Norris, just introduced Greitens, and he’s about to provide the crowd with details about his newest mission: Becoming governor of Missouri.

On campaign stops like these, the uniform of the former Navy SEAL is often a blazer, an Oxford-cloth shirt with no tie, and jeans. His speech delivery is disciplined, sharp and deliberate: At town halls and debates, Greitens argues that Jefferson City’s political class has faltered and failed.

NPR News / NPR Elections

KSMU and NPR News bring you coverage of the final presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, beginning Wednesday at 8 pm. Throughout our coverage, which you can hear on-air and online, check out the NPR fact-checker below to monitor the comments from each presidential candidate.

Stay tuned after the debate for live analysis from NPR's political team. Our coverage runs until 10 pm. Thanks for listening to Ozarks Public Radio!

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