Health

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

Drive down a dirt road in Dallas County, under a thick canopy of walnut trees and over three cattle guards, and you’ll come to Rachel Harrison’s home in Windyville, Missouri.  

A few years ago, Harrison was using her Bachelor’s degree in biology in a hospital laboratory.

“I was a generalist, which means I was in charge of urinalysis, chemistry, special chemistry, hematology, blood banking, coagulation, I think I got it all—phlebotomy, all that kind of stuff,” Harrison said.

But at age 25, she began to hear what sounded like people talking.

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

In the Missouri capitol building in Jefferson City, Representative Holly Rehder, R-Sikeston, has been trying for half a decade to get Missouri to establish a PDMP, or Prescription Drug Monitoring Program.

That’s an electronic records database that would allow prescribers—doctors, dentists, nurse practitioners, and anyone who can prescribe narcotics—to pull up on a screen in the exam room that shows what medicines that patient has been prescribed, and when.

Missouri is the only state where medical professionals don’t have the option of using such a database.

Dierk Schaefer / Flickr

One in every twelve kids in Greene County between 6th and 12th grades is misusing prescription drugs—that’s according to the Missouri Department of Mental Health’s Behavioral Health Profile. And take a guess at the average age for taking that first sip of alcohol: here in Greene County, it’s 13 years old.

All this week, we’re looking at what substance abuse means for our region. 

Jennifer Moore

Hours after his inauguration, President Donald Trump signed an executive order indicating that a repeal of the Affordable Care Act, also known as "Obamacare," is imminent. A repeal could mean different things to those living in cities and those in rural areas. 

To see how a repeal of the ACA could affect Missouri’s poorest and sickest counties, I took a little road trip.

The Good Samaritan Clinic in Mountain View, Missouri sits a two-hour, straight shot east of Springfield on Highway 60.

Springfield Gyms see Membership Spike Beyond New Year

Feb 9, 2016
Emily McTavish / KSMU

One of the most common New Year’s Resolutions is going to the gym and getting in shape. However, how often do those resolutions stick?

Jessica Storm and Madison Chilton joined Genesis Health Clubs in Springfield three weeks ago, and their goal to get in shape and be healthier seems to be working. The pair goes to work out at Genesis six days a week.

“We put it off long enough so we figured now was the best time,” Chilton says.

“It’s time. It’s time to make that commitment,” Storm says.

Pages