Mercy

Springfield will soon be the home of a University of Missouri Clinical Campus and expanded healthcare programs at Missouri State University.

The programs are part of an effort to relieve the statewide shortage of healthcare workers. Each had experienced delays in funding, but improvements in the budget and progress at the legislative level this year are moving the programs forward. Those accomplishments were celebrated in a press conference Tuesday morning.

This summer, families with children whose doctors feel might be on the autism spectrum, won’t have to go to several different places for diagnosis and formulating a treatment plan.  KSMU’s Michele Skalicky has more on the planned Mercy Autism Clinic.

The clinic will operate two days a month—on the 2nd and 3rd Mondays.  Kyle John, child adolescent psychiatrist at Mercy Clinic, says they hope to open it in July.  Primary care doctors will refer children to the clinic where they’ll undergo what he called an “exhaustive evaluation.”

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Across Missouri healthcare policy is changing to include nondiscrimination protections to the LGBT community. That’s according to a 2014 Healthcare Equality Index report, which ranked Missouri 6th in the nation for hospitals qualifying as “Leaders in LGBT Health,” one year after coming in 36th place. KSMU’s Theresa Bettmann has more on the changes in southwest Missouri.

Michele Skalicky / KSMU

Exercise Class

You’re hearing the sounds of an aerobics class at Mercy Fitness Center.  One of the participants is Lois Smith.  She’s a huge advocate for exercise—in fact, she says it enters into almost every conversation she has with people.

She exercises five mornings a week—taking classes like Zumba and Get Up & Go—an aerobic dance class for seniors.

The 82-year-old is in great shape—and that’s partly because of something that happened years ago while she was snow skiing.

Michael Cote / Flickr

A respiratory illness is sending hundreds of kids to hospitals in ten states, including Missouri.  While there have been no confirmed cases in Springfield, medical facilities here have been treating patients with similar symptoms.  KSMU’s Michele Skalicky has more.

The illness that’s affecting children in the U.S. is suspected to be enterovirus D68.  While only a few cases have actually been confirmed, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suspects that’s what’s causing the outbreaks in ten states.

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