Missouri Governor Eric Greitens

Where they stand: What Missouri lawmakers are saying about Gov. Eric Greitens

21 hours ago

Gov. Eric Greitens is facing unprecedented bipartisan calls for his resignation or impeachment after a series of unfolding political and legal scandals.

House Speaker Todd Richardson, R-Poplar Bluff, and Senate President Pro-tem Ron Richard, R-Joplin, on Tuesday became among the latest to join the dozens of lawmakers already calling for the governor to step down. See below how each member of the General Assembly has weighed in on the matter:

Some Missouri lawmakers are questioning the political future of Republican Gov. Eric Greitens after a report from a state House committee. The report details unwanted, sometimes aggressive, sexual encounters between Greitens and his hairdresser. KCUR’s Brian Ellison spoke with House Minority Floor Leader Gail McCann Beatty, a Democrat, and Republican Rep. Kevin Corlew, both from Kansas City.

This story has been updated with additional information.

A Missouri House committee report on Gov. Eric Greitens contains graphic details about the affair between the governor and his former hair stylist, including an unwanted sexual encounter and a threat of blackmail.

The judge in Gov. Eric Greitens’ invasion of privacy trial is ordering attorneys, witnesses and parties to stop talking publicly about certain aspects of the case.

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner

sought and received an order from St. Louis Circuit Judge Burlison on Tuesday that prevents “counsel, the parties, and endorsed witnesses” from “making any public statements outside the courtroom regarding the identity of witnesses and their expected testimony, references to specific evidence to be offered at trial, and any personal belief in the defendant’s guilt or innocence.”

The Missouri House committee investigating Gov. Eric Greitens now has more time to do so.

The deadline for the committee to wrap up its investigation and recommend action has been extended to May 18. That’s four days after the Republican governor’s trial for invasion of privacy is set to begin, and the last day of the 2018 legislative session.

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