Missouri State University

When you read historical text, such as the Bible, you can get glimpses at the cultures of the time periods. You can infer how they lived and what it took to survive in rather harsh environments.

Dr. Victor Matthews, dean of the College of Humanities and Public Affairs at Missouri State University, has been a Biblical scholar for approximately 40 years and shares about his research and latest book, "The Cultural World of the Bible: An Illustrated Guide to Manners and Customs." It is one of 17 books he has authored, and he has published numerous articles on the subject as well.

As you head outdoors during the spring and summer, bask in the beauty of the Ozarks. In the local area we are surrounded by many opportunities to get in touch with nature, by hiking, canoeing, camping and a myriad of other activities.

This is the second in a two part series looking at animals that surround us here in southwest Missouri. Dr. Janice Greene, biologist at Missouri State University, explains her interest in environmental education and  birds. 

Michele Skalicky

High School juniors and seniors are wrapping up a week at a camp southeast of Branson where they're learning about many different aspects of the natural world.  KSMU's Michele Skalicky visited the camp, and has the story.

Temperatures soared into the middle 90s this week, but that didn’t stop young people attending an environmental camp near Kirbyville from working hard in the late morning sun.

Scott Harvey / KSMU

While enrollment of first-year students at Missouri State University has been on an upward trend, it could mean expanding housing services as capacity meets or exceeds needs.

President Clif Smart says a feasibility study is underway to determine the need for a new “traditional style” residence hall.

“If you look back a few years ago our freshmen class; we had a few less than 2,500. And this last year we were about 3,150. In the fall we anticipate being well over 3,200. So we’ve got a growth of about 750 freshmen in the last three years,” says Smart.

From the beginning, Reesha Adamson could sense her calling. She wanted to improve the lives of young people – those of elementary school age, especially – who have behavioral disorders such as oppositional behaviors, depression, anxiety, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that manifest themselves in learning environments. Adamson, who is an assistant professor of special education at Missouri State University, explains her educational philosophy and why it's such an important issue for her.

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