Phyllis Ferguson

Megan Burke/ KSMU

 

Grants announced this week will provide jobs in the environmental field and clean up contaminated areas in Springfield. 

 

 

At a news conference Wednesday, Olivia Hough, Springfield’s Brownfields coordinator, announced the Environmental Protection Agency has awarded a three-year grant to the city to assess brownfields.

 

 

According to Hough, brownfields are potentially contaminated properties that must be assessed and remediated before they can be developed.

 

 

 

Randy Scritchfield
Scott Harvey / KSMU

It’s an unseasonably warm 70 degrees in late November and I’m riding shotgun in a 1968 Plymouth GTX driven by Randy Scritchfield. We’re traveling eastbound on Kearney Street in Springfield, simulating a tradition that started in the 1950s and re-launched this spring after years of prohibition.

“Cruisers traditionally drive slow,” he tells me. “That way another cruiser might catch up to you.”

For the 64-year-old Scritchfield, cruising back in the early 1970s – when he started – meant driving from the Kearney Street McDonalds to Glenstone. 

Springfield’s Zone 1 candidates shared their vision for the city’s north side Thursday while offering opinions ranging from repercussions for the police chief to the future of the Jefferson Avenue Footbridge. 

Incumbent Phyllis Ferguson and challenger Thomas Quinn took questions for an hour Thursday before some 50 attendees at the Library Station. The forum was arranged by the Springfield News-Leader, which began the event with a series of questions before lending way to citizen queries.

Mike Smith / KSMU

City of Springfield Zone 1 Council Person Phyllis Ferguson has a long history of community involvement. Even before her appointment to City Council in April 2015, Ferguson had a reputation as a tireless advocate for the 40,000 residents of Springfield’s northwest quadrant.

“I think people have to understand, there are very deep roots in northwest Springfield.  We have really wonderful homes there, we have great parks and strong neighborhoods.  We don’t have a lot of traffic, and I think those are assets people forget,” she said.

Scott Harvey / KSMU

No longer will use of public transportation for hours be the best way some Springfield citizens access job placement services.

City officials on Monday formally unveiled its new job center location inside Cox North. The 1,900 square foot space solves an issue of access, according to Springfield Workforce Development Director Mary Ann Rojas.

“Individuals that required public transportation to get to our facility on Sunshine Avenue had to take up to two hours to get there using public transportation,” she said.

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