Sen. Bob Dixon

At the tail end of a recent episode of the Politically Speaking podcast, state Sen. Jill Schupp was asked a fairly straightforward question: Had her colleagues learned anything from the resignations of John Diehl and Paul LeVota, two lawmakers who stepped down last year amid accusations of inappropriate behavior toward female interns?

The Creve Coeur Democrat provided a pessimistic response:

A Senate committee is considering a bill (SB 731) to allow students to carry concealed weapons on college campuses in Missouri.

The bill, proposed by state Sen. Brian Munzlinger,  R-Williamstown, drew a strong reaction from both supporters and opponents during a hearing today.

Missouri’s crowded GOP contest for governor has lost a participant, as state Sen. Bob Dixon is dropping out.

The departure of Dixon, R-Springfield, isn’t entirely unexpected. He was at the bottom of the pack when it came to fundraising. His last campaign finance report showed him with less than $83,000 in the bank.

(Updated 2 p.m. Mon., July 27)

Missouri’s Republican contest for governor has gotten less crowded — at least for now — as state Sen. Mike Parson has decided to run for the state’s No. 2 post instead. And on Monday, he released a list of supporters, including the state Senate's leadership.

Meanwhile, the GOP’s newest gubernatorial candidate — state Sen. Bob Dixon of Springfield — offered some details about his previously acknowledged past in the 1980s when he lived several years as a young gay man.

In an emailed statement to St. Louis Public Radio, Dixon blamed child abuse for what he called “teenage confusion.” He now is married, has three children and is a staunch social conservative who believes in traditional marriage.

Scott Harvey / KSMU

State Senator Bob Dixon says citizens need a leader who will provide “sensible, conservative solutions to Missouri families.”

Before some 100 supporters Monday morning, Dixon used the front porch of his north Springfield home to formally announce his candidacy for the Republican nomination for Missouri governor. He said it’s time to renew Missouri’s spirit, adding there should be more pride in the political process and branches of government than exists today.

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