Springfield

Michele Skalicky

A monument, installed nearly 100 years ago and marking explorer Henry Rowe Schoolcraft’s journey in the 19th Century to the area that’s now Springfield, is now accessible to the public.  

When explorer, Henry Rowe Schoolcraft, arrived at what is now Springfield in early January, 1818, the land was yet unspoiled.  He described prairie grass so tall that a man could ride a horse through it without being seen.

Community Partnership of the Ozarks

A local homeless advocate says she’s hopeful people living in makeshift camp sites that received notice Thursday (2/4) they’ll need to move will receive long-term help.

After property owners complained, police and local homeless advocates visited the three camps Thursday and let those living there know that they had 48 hours to leave.

Michelle Garand is deputy director of affordable housing and homeless prevention at the Community Partnership of the Ozarks.

bransonchamber.com

A new report from one of the world’s largest online hotel search sites lists Springfield and Branson among “America’s Best Value Towns & Cities.”

The report from Trivago.com ranks Branson number one as the best value city in the country and Springfield at number seven.

The rankings were compiled using Trivago’s Best Value Index, which uses the annual average price of a standard double room and the city’s average hotel rating by trivago.com users.

Drury University

Trees not only contribute to the aesthetics of a community, they provide so much more.  And area cities and organizations know this:  Drury University received a first time recognition as a Tree Campus, while Springfield and West Plains have continued to maintain Tree City USA titles.  KSMU’s Theresa Bettmann talks with local arborists to learn more about what it takes to achieve this type of recognition and why this is so important.

Andrew Magill; Flickr

On a list of 150 most recession-recovered cities in the U.S., Springfield ranks 120th.  The study by WalletHub looks at the progress of local cities in propelling their economic growth.

The study used 18 key metrics—from the inflow of college-educated workers and number of new businesses to unemployment rates and home price appreciation—to examine how each city has evolved economically over the last few years.