Springfield City Council

Covering policy decisions, issues from Springfield City Council.

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Applications are being accepted for the Zone 4 Springfield City Council seat.  Craig Fishel resigned from that position last week.

The city clerk’s office will accept applications Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. through February 16. 

Michele Skalicky

Motorists in the city limits of Springfield can now be pulled over for not wearing their seat belts.  This week, Springfield City Council approved a bill that allows for primary enforcement of seat belt violations.  Prior to this, a person would have to be pulled over for another violation before a citation for not wearing a seat belt could be issued.

Council member, Kristi Fulnecky, opposed the bill and said it’s unnecessary.

Henry Burrows / Flickr

You’ll now be able to drink alcoholic beverages in nine Springfield-Greene County Park Board facilities. 

Springfield City Council Monday approved an amendment in city code removing the restriction of alcohol in public parks.  Alcohol is still prohibited in 95 parks locations after the Springfield-Greene County Park Board approved a new park regulation prior to City Council’s vote.

Google Maps

One change to city code allows police officers to ticket pedestrians for crossing the street outside of a crosswalk one half hour after sunset to one half hour before sunrise.  The bill adds language saying motorists must yield to pedestrians crossing in designated crosswalks or face a minimum fine of $100. 

Stacy / Flickr

The recently-passed pit bull ban in Springfield will go before voters next August. 

Springfield City Council voted Monday not to repeal the ban put in place in October but, instead, voted to let the public decide.

Council member Kristi Fulnecky made a motion to move the election up to April, but that motion failed.

The ban is on hold for now.

Fulnecky was the only dissenting vote on the ordinance placing the issue on the ballot.  She says it was a slap in the face to constituents to not repeal the ban.

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