Springfield City Council

Covering policy decisions, issues from Springfield City Council.

frankieleon / Flickr

Springfield City Council could vote in just under two weeks on a prescription drug monitoring program for the city.  A public hearing last night brought those for and against a PDMP before council.

Katie Towns, assistant director of health for the Springfield-Greene County Health Department, said implementing a program locally would help in the fight against opioid addiction.

Springfield Wants to Curb Use of Harmful Sealants

Jun 16, 2017
St. Joseph County / Quote_Parking Lot Services

The city of Springfield is voluntarily refraining from using coal tar based sealants (CTBS) at its facilities after studies suggest they can be harmful to streams and aquatic life.

The City Council’s Community Involvement Committee met on Tuesday to discuss an alternative method of the compound. The CTBS contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), a group of chemicals that can be found in products made from fossil fuels.

healthline.com

An ordinance to implement a prescription drug monitoring program in Springfield will go to the full city council for a vote after a council committee--the Community Involvement Committee—unanimously agreed Tuesday to take that action.

Before the vote, the Springfield-Greene County Health Department and Springfield’s Healthy Living Alliance recommended moving forward with the ordinance.

Springfield is planning to join a largely state-wide effort to receive a federal grant to implement a PDMP.  The grant would cover the cost of a program for the first two years.

Richard Ollis
Ollis/Akers/Arney website

The Springfield City Council Tuesday chose Richard Ollis, an insurance company CEO, to fill the General Seat D post.

The seat became vacant after the April election of councilmen Ken McClure as mayor.

Ollis, 56, is the CEO of Ollis/Akers/Arney, where he serves a risk and insurance advisor. The company, according to its website, is Springfield’s largest independent insurance agency.

Ollis was chosen among five other candidates that council had interviewed for the post. 

Scott Harvey

Springfield City Council has taken steps towards deciding what to do about the Jefferson Avenue Footbridge.  During a workshop Tuesday night they looked at five options, presented by Spencer Jones, an engineer with Great River Engineering:

A.) Do Nothing.  Demolition of the bridge is estimated to cost $410,000

B.) Minimal Rehab with Future Replacement.  The option includes a minimal rehab today with a replacement structure in 2029.  Initial cost would be $2.3 million with a cumulative cost of $10.9 million

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