Springfield NAACP

Megan Burke

A variety of colleges and universities, government agencies and civil rights groups joined hands Wednesday night in Springfield to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination.

 

The event was held at the Springfield Art Museum and featured a discussion, spoken word pieces, theatrical performances and fine art.

 

Scott Harvey

An event Monday, January 15, in Springfield will celebrate the life of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

A march from Mediacom Ice Park, 635 E. Trafficway, to the Gillioz Theatre, 325 Park Central  East, will start at 9 a.m., followed by a program.  The theme is “We Stand Up for Justice.” 

The NAACP will collect new hats, gloves, scarves and socks for area youth and teens at both locations. 

Michele Skalicky

Springfield NAACP Branch President Cheryl Clay says the travel advisory for Missouri is just that—an advisory, not a ban.  During a press conference Tuesday Clay described the advisory as “a warning that Missouri is not a safe place for travel or work for people of color.” 

Scott Harvey / KSMU

Unity was among the keywords recited during an interfaith service Friday morning in Springfield just as inauguration festivities were beginning in Washington, D.C.

Roughly two dozen faith and community leaders offered prayers, readings and musical selections inside historic Washington Avenue Baptist Church at Drury University. Many called for strengthening goodwill toward others amid a divisive political climate.

Rev. Mark Struckhoff said the purpose was to “pray for love to reign.” 

Scott Harvey / KSMU

On an overcast morning, thousands gathered Monday to shine light on the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. during the annual march through downtown Springfield.

Beginning at Mediacom Ice Park, marches traveled north over the Benton Ave bridge that bears the Civil Rights leader’s name, and then south on Jefferson Ave before finishing with a program at the Gillioz Theater.

This year’s theme was “Your Life Your Choice: Our Voices Matter.”

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