Springfield Public Works

Hazelwood Cemetery
Claire Kidwell / KSMU

Springfield officials hope to upgrade one of the state’s largest municipally-operated cemeteries.  Hazelwood Cemetery turned 150 years old this month. It serves as the final resting place of many notable citizens; including Springfield founder John Polk Campbell and Route 66 visionary John T. Woodruff.

Officials gathered Saturday at the site to commemorate its sesquicentennial.

Pete Williams, the head of the Visioning Committee, said that people will be seeing some “good changes” in the future.

Rachael Cohoon / KSMU

A new safety campaign launched by the city of Springfield aims to make drivers and pedestrians more aware of their surroundings.  The city says an average of 60 pedestrians are involved in motor vehicle accidents per year.

Mandy Buettgen-Quinn, traffic safety professional for Springfield Public Works, says pedestrian crashes and fatalities are skyrocketing.

“Part of that is distraction and another part is the communication piece between drivers and pedestrians,” she says.

Road closed sign
Theresa Bettmann / KSMU

It’s nearing rush hour around dusk as I walk with Mary Kay Glunt. She’s not only the secretary of the Doling Neighborhood Association, but as she reminds me with a smile—also a neighbor.  We walk around the corner of Fort and Talmage—the area known as the Talmage Dip, just one of the many infrastructure improvement projects underway as part of the Zone Blitz.  

Springfield snowplow
Hard Working Trucks

Springfield Public Works says salt supplies are full, vehicles have been inspected and its Street Operations division is ready for the impending winter season.

Superintendent of Streets Ron Bailey says crews have been preparing for the snow removal season since September, and have over 9,000 tons of salt on-hand.

“The guys who run these plow trucks all winter are ready to handle whatever comes their way,” said Bailey. “We have a great bunch of guys who are willing to help our citizens and dedicated to the tasks given them.”

Claire Kidwell / KSMU

Intersection and roadway improvements in south Springfield are among the first projects the city will tackle with funds from recently renewed sales taxes.

More than 85 percent of Springfield voters said yes Tuesday to the continuation of the city’s ¼-cent Capital Improvement Sales Tax and the 1/8-cent Transportation Sales Tax.

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