Telemedicine

CoxHealth

Students in several area schools will soon be able to get a medical diagnosis without leaving the school building.  A Missouri Foundation for Health grant will allow CoxHealth telemedicine to be used in six elementary schools with the goal of reducing absenteeism. 

Over a three-year period, mobile telehealth carts will be placed in schools in Cassville, Forsyth, Monett, Mountain Grove, Ozark and Reeds Spring.  That will allow kids to be seen at school via video for acute ailments such as sore throats, chronic coughs and the flu.

CoxHealth

Missourians now have another option when it comes to seeking treatment for minor illnesses.  CoxHealth has expanded its telemedicine service, DirectConnect, to individuals.  Previously, it had been offered only to employers.

Bridget O’Hara, product manager at Cox, said it’s an affordable option for those who need care—each “visit” is $49—and she said it frees up space in the ER and urgent care.

According to O’Hara, the service is easy to use.  She compares it to using Skype or Face Time.

Say you're a Midwestern farmer in a hospital bed, recovering from surgery or a major illness. It's time for the nurse's check-in, but there's no knock on the door.

At Mercy Hospital in St. Louis, a camera attached to the wall over the foot of the bed whirls around, as a video monitor next to the camera lights up to show a smiling face with a headset on.

"Good afternoon, this is Jeff with SafeWatch," the smiling face says. "Just doing my afternoon rounds."