Education

Education news and issues in the Ozarks.

Do you like growing your own plants, fruits and vegetables? Then the upcoming Greenhouse and High Tunnel Workshop at Missouri State University’s (MSU) Fruit Experiment Station in Mountain Grove might just be for you. 

Scheduled from Oct. 12-13, 2017, the workshop is a joint effort among Missouri State’s Darr College of Agriculture, University of Missouri Cooperative Extension and Lincoln University.

Ryan Welch / KSMU

All this week, we’re investigating civility and what role it plays in our community.

Today, we’re considering the news media:  what role do – or should – journalists play in encouraging civil discourse?  And what’s the state of civility in terms of how journalists themselves are treated?

Let’s tackle that one first by taking a step back and looking through a nationwide lens.

Michele Skalicky

At times it seems that civility is dead.  People are constantly at odds with one another, and shouting matches are all too common, especially online.  Social media is often used as a battleground where people who disagree on various issues fight with words.   People who were once friends no longer talk because their political or other beliefs are different.  

Despite that, there are many things happening in the Ozarks that show civility and attempts to understand one another are, in fact, very much alive.

Ryan Welch / KSMU

Through the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, people are guaranteed the freedom to, among other liberties, peaceably assemble. Whether they’re called protests, rallies, or marches, there’s a long history in this county of its citizens coming together to stimulate support for or opposition to various causes. They’re held on street corners, in front of government buildings, and on college campuses.

On the first day of classes this fall at Missouri State University, hundreds gathered in solidarity with Charlottesville to speak out against racism after events in the Virginia city turned violent.

“This event was constructed to bring us all together at the beginning of a school year and to encourage spirit and comradery amongst all of us Bears regardless of our identities,” said Britt Spears, president of the MSU Chapter of the NAACP on Aug. 21.

Ellis Hall
Ryan Welch / KSMU

Hundreds gathered inside Missouri State University’s Ellis Hall Sunday for the renovated music building’s dedication ceremony. Community members filed in for self-guided tours and to hear music by Missouri State’s Chorale and brass band.

Dr. Shawn Wahl, interim dean of the College of Arts and Letters, said the upgraded facility sends a message to students to be “bigger and bolder.” He said Missouri State can now be a “destination school” for the arts.

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