Education

Education news and issues in the Ozarks.

Ryan Welch / KSMU

Through the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, people are guaranteed the freedom to, among other liberties, peaceably assemble. Whether they’re called protests, rallies, or marches, there’s a long history in this county of its citizens coming together to stimulate support for or opposition to various causes. They’re held on street corners, in front of government buildings, and on college campuses.

On the first day of classes this fall at Missouri State University, hundreds gathered in solidarity with Charlottesville to speak out against racism after events in the Virginia city turned violent.

“This event was constructed to bring us all together at the beginning of a school year and to encourage spirit and comradery amongst all of us Bears regardless of our identities,” said Britt Spears, president of the MSU Chapter of the NAACP on Aug. 21.

Ellis Hall
Ryan Welch / KSMU

Hundreds gathered inside Missouri State University’s Ellis Hall Sunday for the renovated music building’s dedication ceremony. Community members filed in for self-guided tours and to hear music by Missouri State’s Chorale and brass band.

Dr. Shawn Wahl, interim dean of the College of Arts and Letters, said the upgraded facility sends a message to students to be “bigger and bolder.” He said Missouri State can now be a “destination school” for the arts.

Clif Smart
Ryan Welch / KSMU

After years of increased appropriations for higher education, Missouri’s recent revenue situation has led to fewer dollars for the state’s colleges and universities. And it’s not expected to get better anytime soon. That’s why at Missouri State University officials began this summer preparing a financial sustainability plan.

Ryan Welch / KSMU

Clothed in orange and holding signs, roughly a dozen Missouri State University students kneeling at the base of the Strong Hall amphitheater Friday were joined by over one hundred onlookers to express their support for DACA.

Michele Skalicky

Teachers and principals at 41 Springfield schools can move forward with innovative projects for their students thanks to grants they’ve received.  The money, $276,869, comes from donors who gave to the Back to School Grant Program at the Foundation for Springfield Public Schools.

Dr. John Jungmann, superintendent of SPS, noted that Saturday is the 150th birthday of the district.  "This is the best birthday present we've ever received," he said.  "I guarantee it."

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