Missouri Legislature

Covering state lawmakers, bills, and policy emerging from Jefferson City.

Jay Ashcroft
Scott Harvey / KSMU

Missouri’s Secretary of State is pushing for the state’s libraries to get the funding he says they’ve been promised.

Republican Jay Ashcroft on Friday toured the Library Center, the main branch for the Springfield-Greene County Library District. 

“Statutorily, libraries are supposed to get, if I remember correctly, 10 percent of the out-of-state entertainers and athletes tax; which is about four million dollars and change it’s always estimated. We’ve never gotten that,” Ashcroft told KSMU.  

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens is one of the more prominent Jewish political leaders in America today. For him, his response to this week’s vandalism at Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery in University City  goes hand-in-hand with his “go to the front lines” philosophy.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. Feb. 23 — The debate over which bathrooms transgender students can use has come to Missouri.

A Missouri Senate committee heard testimony Tuesday on Senate Bill 98, which would require students at K-12 public schools throughout the state to use restrooms, locker rooms and shower facilities that correspond to their "biological sex."

Often when a candidate loses a high-profile race, he or she prefers to lay low for a while. That’s not the case for former Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander.

It’s been three months since he narrowly lost his bid to oust Republican U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt.  Since then, Kander has attracted— and seemingly sought —more national attention than he had during the campaign.

But in an interview with St. Louis Public Radio, the 35-year-old Democrat downplayed the significance. 

Right to Work
Scott Harvey / KSMU

The debate over the economic impact of Missouri’s right-to-work law did not end when Gov. Eric Greitens’ signed Senate Bill 19 on Monday, which prohibits unions and employers from requiring workers to pay dues.

Hours after the bill signing, labor interests filed a referendum petition that would delay the implementation of the law until voters can weigh in on the matter.

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