Missouri Legislature

Covering state lawmakers, bills, and policy emerging from Jefferson City.

Ryan Welch / KSMU

Rep. Lynn Morris says his bill attempting to cap the interest rates charged by payday lenders will have to wait until next year.

Morris, a Republican from Ozark, spoke in Springfield Friday a week before lawmakers end this year’s legislative session. His bill would place a cap of 36 percent on what payday and title loaners can charge customers.

“It’s going to take more than a year to pass this bill, but what I promise to you all is I will make this one of my priorities.”

When Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens was merely Candidate Eric Greitens, the Republican didn't have a subtle opinion about secret money in his state's politics.

Billy Long
Scott Harvey / KSMU

By a narrow margin, the U.S. House of Representatives Thursday approved a measure that would do away with many provisions of the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare.

The Republican-drafted bill passed 217-213, and now moves to the Senate.

Rep. Billy Long is one of those supporters. His vote Thursday comes just two days after the Republican from southwest Missouri said he was against the measure.

The Missouri Senate sang, talked about fist fights and criticized each other this week. What they haven't done is pass any bills.

As of Wednesday, just seven working days remain in this year’s legislative session. Plus, the spending plan for the coming fiscal year must be delivered to Gov. Eric Greitens by 6 p.m., Friday, otherwise, they’ll need a special session.

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt for years wasn’t shy about his disdain for the Affordable Care Act, condemning it on the Senate floor, in town hall meetings and during interviews.

Then came Tuesday, when the Republican said fixing President Barack Obama’s signature health-care law doesn’t hinge on whether Congress takes action this week to do away with it entirely.

Pages