Missouri Legislature

Covering state lawmakers, bills, and policy emerging from Jefferson City.

The Missouri Democratic Party announced an ambitious set of health care proposals Tuesday, including expansion of Medicaid and policy changes focused on veterans, women’s health and opioid abuse.

Republicans control the House, Senate and Governor’s office in Missouri, making it unlikely the proposals will be adopted. But Stephen Webber, the party chair, said Democrats still want to present a “positive proactive vision.”

Ryan Welch / KSMU

Through the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, people are guaranteed the freedom to, among other liberties, peaceably assemble. Whether they’re called protests, rallies, or marches, there’s a long history in this county of its citizens coming together to stimulate support for or opposition to various causes. They’re held on street corners, in front of government buildings, and on college campuses.

On the first day of classes this fall at Missouri State University, hundreds gathered in solidarity with Charlottesville to speak out against racism after events in the Virginia city turned violent.

“This event was constructed to bring us all together at the beginning of a school year and to encourage spirit and comradery amongst all of us Bears regardless of our identities,” said Britt Spears, president of the MSU Chapter of the NAACP on Aug. 21.

 

Updated 7:25 p.m. with exclusive comments from Chappelle-Nadal — Maria Chappelle-Nadal won’t lose her seat in the Missouri Senate, the chamber decided Wednesday. But the Democrat is being censured — a move that apparently hasn’t happened before and is little more than a written reprimand.

Gov. Eric Greitens and Lt. Gov. Mike Parson said last month that the University City Democrat should be expelled for posting a Facebook comment in which she wished for President Donald Trump’s assassination. There wasn’t enough support among Senate members for that to happen Wednesday during the otherwise-quiet veto session. Instead, the GOP majority censured her by a 28-2 vote for her now-deleted post.

Missouri House Republicans chose Rep. Elijah Haahr on Tuesday to succeed Todd Richardson as speaker, assuming the GOP keeps its majority in the lower chamber.

Richardson is barred from serving beyond 2018 because of term limits. Haahr, 35, will take over in January 2019.  

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens won’t call a special session to coincide with next week’s veto session — a decision that may save state Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal from expulsion.

The bipartisan appetite to oust the University City Democrat over an Aug. 17 Facebook comment, in which she wished for President Donald Trump’s assassination, must now come from state lawmakers themselves.

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