Jennifer Moore / KSMU

More Graduates, Student Loan Paybacks Needed to Fix Mental Health Shortage

Elementary school kids form a line behind their teacher as they prepare to tour the House chamber in the Missouri Capitol building. Statistically, about one in every nine of these kids will have a major depressive episode between the ages of 12 and 17, according to the Missouri Department of Mental Health. State lawmakers, who draft laws that regulate and fund many mental health programs, just wrapped up their 2017 session. More than half of Missouri’s counties don’t have a licensed...

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GOP Health Plan Would Leave 23 Million More Uninsured, Budget Office Says

The revised Republican bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act will leave 23 million more people uninsured in 2026 than if that act, also known as Obamacare, were to remain in place. The GOP bill would also reduce the deficit by $119 billion over 10 years. That's what the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office reported Wednesday in its latest score of the American Health Care Act. The CBO's assessment shows that the deficit would fall and premiums would fall for some Americans,...

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The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that President Trump's controversial travel ban should be kept on hold, largely maintaining a nationwide preliminary injunction that blocks the executive order from being enforced.

A 13-judge panel of the court heard arguments over the ban earlier this month. In Thursday's decision, the chief judge writes that the travel ban "drips with religious intolerance, animus, and discrimination."

Skirting California's coastline, Highway 1 offers a popular and dramatic drive through the Big Sur region. On a normal day, a drive along the winding two-lane road gets one's heart pumping with fears of plunging down the hillside.

But a weekend landslide has reshaped the coastline and closed part of the route, as a third of a mile of highway is now covered with dirt and rocks at an area called Mud Creek.

As you can see in the before-and-after graphic below, where the coast used to form roughly a straight line, it's now a rocky bulge into the Pacific.

NASA's Juno spacecraft has spotted giant cyclones swirling at Jupiter's north and south poles.

That's just one of the unexpected and puzzling findings being reported by the Juno science team.

The sudden resignation of an Obama appointee who oversaw student aid at the U.S. Department of Education has brought forth competing explanations.

Despite the toxic ingredients commonly found in e-cigarettes and other vaping products, many adults don't think secondhand e-cigarette aerosol poses a risk to children, according to a report published Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

About one-third of adults surveyed didn't know if secondhand aerosol caused harm to children, and 40 percent of the adults said this kind of exposure caused "little" or "some" harm to children.

Sure, it's not the singularity (yet) — but it is a rather singular achievement.

The Atlantic hurricane season could see between two and four major hurricanes in 2017, according to the latest forecast from NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. There's only a 20 percent chance that this season will be less active than normal, the agency says.

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Police in Manchester, England, have reportedly decided to stop sharing some intelligence with the U.S. after details from their ongoing terrorism investigation were apparently leaked to the American press.

President Trump pledged that the source of the leaks will be identified. Trump said in a statement that he has directed the Department of Justice to open an investigation — and that "if appropriate," the person responsible will be "prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law."

“Woods Hole days end” by Purpose is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Everyone possesses some measure of curiosity.  But, becoming a scientist requires an enhanced level of that innate quality.  However, some people decide to pursue science for reasons other than the deepening of knowledge.  When these other motivations, such as power or money, dominate the fundamental quest to know, does science mean as much? 

Perhaps the reasons we all do the things we do should be examined from time to time, if only to keep us honest to ourselves and to the idea of science.

  
 

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