Jason Kander
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Kander Touts Support for Middle Class, Blasts Congress' Vacation

Missouri Secretary of State and Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate Jason Kander says Congress should be fired for not doing its job. During a stop in Springfield Wednesday, Kander railed against both the House and Senate for taking time off before solving important issues. Congress is currently in week two of a seven week recess, which Kander said “they had not earned.” He pointed to items like failure to pass a funding package to protect against the Zika virus. “This is something that puts...
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Failed Assassins: Would-be Presidential Shooters In History

A judge granted John Hinckley Jr. his freedom this week, 35 years after Hinckley shot President Ronald Reagan.His release from a mental hospital comes with a handful of limitations: Hinckley will live with his elderly mother in Williamsburg, Va., he cannot contact his victims, their relatives or the actress he was obsessed with at the time of the shooting, Jodie Foster.Hinckley is far from the first would-be presidential assassin to be released from incarceration. Leaving aside the fates of...
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With two troubling investigations ongoing and other questions looming, University of Louisville President James Ramsey resigned Wednesday, the school says. The university is facing scrutiny over separate scandals that involve financial misdeeds and sex parties for athletes.

Times are tough for Chesapeake oysters.

For one thing, they used to be bigger. "If you look at what people were saying back in the 1600s and 1700s about oysters, people had to cut them in half before they could even eat them," says Denise Breitburg, an ecologist with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.

The third night of the 2016 Democratic Convention scaled several major peaks: President Obama gave, perhaps, the best-written oration of his career. Vice President Joe Biden gave, perhaps, his last national convention address, and his prospective successor, Tim Kaine, gave his first.

America's first image of Chelsea Clinton was as a curly-haired preteen girl with braces who shied away from the public stage while her father was president in the 1990s.

More than two decades later, the now 36-year-old mother of two will voluntarily step into the spotlight to introduce her own mother as her family seeks a return to the White House.

There's a new book out about the student loan crisis, or what author Sandy Baum suggests is a "bogus crisis." Baum, a financial aid expert and senior fellow at the Urban Institute, claims it's been manufactured by the media in search of a spicy story and fueled by politicians pushing "debt free college" proposals.

Not surprisingly, we had a few questions for Baum about the book, Student Debt: Rhetoric and Realities of Higher Education.

Hillary Rodham's 1969 commencement address at Wellesley College did not stand out because of what she said.

It stood out because of how she said it, and because she said it at all. This is a story not about words, but about context.

Before 1969, Wellesley had never had a student speaker at commencement. Administrators spoke and special guests spoke, but students at this women's college didn't have a voice on graduation day.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Call It A Cat And Cat Game

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From On Air To On The Court

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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