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Fulnecky and McClure Offer Views on Governing Style at Mayor's Forum

From evaluating the city’s public safety needs and its court-tested policies to assessing their diplomatic abilities, to two candidates for Springfield mayor shared how they would govern if elected during a Thursday forum. Kristi Fulnecky and Ken McClure, both general seat incumbents on the City Council, took questions before some 160 spectators at the Library Center. Background Fulnecky is the owner of Fulnecky Law and Fulnecky Enterprises, a construction management company. She currently...

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Failed House Vote Is 'A Great Opportunity' For Republicans, Former House Leader Says

After yesterday's pulled health care vote, many on the left and the right are seeing it as a failure for Republicans — but former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay says it's actually a blessing in disguise. Tom DeLay served in Congress as representative for Texas's 22 nd district from 1984 to 2005, when he resigned in the midst of a money laundering scandal. In 1995, DeLay was elected House Majority Whip and in 2002, he was elected House Majority Leader. DeLay gained a reputation for his...

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No rest for the weary in our weekly roundup of national education news.

Supreme Court rules on special education case

"I'm thrilled," said Amanda Morin, a parent and advocate with the web site Understood.org, after the Supreme Court ruled unanimously in a case that could affect 6.5 million special education students. "Now I can actually go into a school system and say 'The Supreme Court has said, based on my child's abilities, he is legally entitled to make progress.'"

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And now we're back with NPR's congressional correspondent, Sue Davis. Hi there again.

SUSAN DAVIS, BYLINE: Hey there.

MCEVERS: And we have White House correspondent Scott Horsley also. Hi, Scott.

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Utah Gov. Gary Herbert signed a bill Thursday lowering the state’s DUI limit from .08 percent to .05 percent — the lowest in the nation. It follows heavy lobbying on both sides of the issue, and pit traffic safety concerns and religious morals against worries about the state’s reputation and tourism.

KUER’s Nicole Nixon (@_Nixo) discusses the change with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson.

Ryan Welch / KSMU

From evaluating the city’s public safety needs and its court-tested policies to assessing their diplomatic abilities, to two candidates for Springfield mayor shared how they would govern if elected during a Thursday forum.

Kristi Fulnecky and Ken McClure, both general seat incumbents on the City Council, took questions before some 160 spectators at the Library Center.

Background

Former Penn State president Graham Spanier was convicted Friday of child endangerment for his role in the sexual abuse scandal involving former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky.

In a split verdict, the Pennsylvania jury found that Spanier's handling of a 2001 complaint alleging abuse by Sandusky, warranted conviction on one of three charges against him. The jury did, however, acquit Spanier of conspiracy and a second count of child endangerment, the Associated Press reports.

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And we have Congressman Bradley Byrne of Alabama. He actually supported this bill. Welcome, Congressman.

BRADLEY BYRNE: It's good to be back on the program.

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In a series of memorandums sent to U.S. embassies, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has offered a glimpse of what President Trump's promised "extreme vetting" will mean for visa applicants when put into practice.

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