Jennifer Moore

KSMU Contributor/Missouri State University Journalist-in-Residence

As the Journalist-in-Residence at Missouri State University, Jennifer teaches undergraduate and graduate students, oversees a semester-long, team reporting project, and contributes weekly stories to KSMU Radio in the area of public affairs journalism.

Ways to Connect

Ryan Welch / KSMU

All this week, we’re investigating civility and what role it plays in our community.

Today, we’re considering the news media:  what role do – or should – journalists play in encouraging civil discourse?  And what’s the state of civility in terms of how journalists themselves are treated?

Let’s tackle that one first by taking a step back and looking through a nationwide lens.

Christ Episcopal Church

On the corner of Kimbrough and Walnut in downtown Springfield sits one of the city’s oldest churches:  Christ Episcopal Church.  Inside, the Reverend Kenneth L. Chumbley, or “Father Ken” as he’s known, is delivering a sermon to his flock.

Father Ken has been here for nearly 22 years, and he says he’d rate the state of civility among Christian groups here in Springfield as “good.”

“It’s healthy. In my experience here, I can think of no occasion when Christians have been uncivil to one another. I think generally, we treat one another very respectfully. I think we generally treat one another as children of God,” Chumbley said.

Sarah Teague/Claire Kidwell
KSMU

A total of  305 law enforcement officers were on duty during President Donald Trump’s visit to Springfield Wednesday – that includes officers from the Springfield Police Department, Greene County, and the Missouri State Highway Patrol, according to SPD spokeswoman Lisa Cox.

Officers kept a close eye on the protesters and anti-protesters who came out of the woodwork to exercise their First Amendment rights to the freedom of speech and of assembly.

Flickr / File Photo

Suicide rates are higher in rural areas than urban areas—and the gap between urban and rural suicide rates is widening, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  

A small clinic sits on the main drag in Mansfield, Missouri – that’s in Wright County, one of Missouri’s 70 counties without a full-time psychiatrist, according to the Missouri Board of Healing Arts.

Theresa Thompson / Flickr

Poll workers, or “election judges” as they’re officially called, are those citizens who hand you your ballot and give instructions when you go to vote.

And they often come from an older demographic in Missouri. 

Shane Schoeller is the Greene County Clerk--so he’s on the hook for making sure there are enough qualified workers to run the polling places come Election Day.

Traditionally, it’s been easier to recruit people who are retired, he said.

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