Jennifer Moore

News Director & Content Coordinator

As News Director, Jennifer oversees news gathering and production for KSMU-Ozarks Public Radio; in her role as Content Coordinator, she makes sure all programs on KSMU, including those produced locally, nationally, and internationally, flow seamlessly over the air.  She trains the student reporters and announcers and hosts the monthly program Engaging the Community.

Jennifer hails from West Plains, Missouri, and graduated from the University of Missouri School of Journalism. Her Master's Degree from Missouri State University blended Middle Eastern politics and journalism. She lived in the Persian Gulf for five years and studied at the American University in Cairo. 

She's the author of "Covering Elections for Smaller Newsrooms: A Template," and is always eager to hear story ideas or feedback from community members and listeners.

Ways to Connect

KSMU

Missouri is one of five states that prosecute all 17-year-olds as adults in the criminal justice system, no matter the offense.  There’s an effort to change that in the Show-Me State to where 17-year-olds would instead go through the juvenile justice system as kids. 

The Justice Policy Institute, an organization that advocates for raising the age to 18 nationwide, says the change is needed to keep young people safe.

americanbar.org

The Missouri Supreme Court ruled last week that a public defender in southeast Missouri had to get approval from a judge before rejecting new cases.

The head of Missouri’s Public Defender System, Michael Barrett, tells KSMU the most recent ruling creates a conflict for his team of attorneys because they are expected to take on an extraordinarily high number of cases—while still being held to the same ethical standards, and disciplanary action, as other lawyers.

Jennifer Moore

A few years ago, when the political debate was raging over whether to expand Missouri’s Medicaid program as part of Obamacare, we brought you the story of Anita Sutherland of south-central Missouri.  She was one of the estimated 300,000 Missourians who would have suddenly been covered if Missouri lawmakers had accepted those federal dollars to expand the government program.

Missouri State Parks

There's a place in the Ozarks where wild horses still roam and where the most adventurous of hikers can wander the wilderness for days.

For those listeners looking for a fall adventure, I took a day trip with my daughter to Missouri’s newest developed state park, Echo Bluff State Park, and brought along a recorder so we could create an audio postcard.

We begin by loading up the bikes since Echo Bluff has plenty of trails.

Ryan Welch / KSMU

All this week, we’re investigating civility and what role it plays in our community.

Today, we’re considering the news media:  what role do – or should – journalists play in encouraging civil discourse?  And what’s the state of civility in terms of how journalists themselves are treated?

Let’s tackle that one first by taking a step back and looking through a nationwide lens.

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